Author Archives: Harold Henkel

About Harold Henkel

Associate Librarian

Book Discussion: A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens

“If I could work my will,” said Scrooge indignantly, “Every idiot who goes about with ‘Merry Christmas’ on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.”

"Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence were all my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!"

“Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence were all my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!”

Ebenezer Scrooge is miser who hates Christmas and all it stands for, but a ghostly visitor foretells three apparitions who will bring about a change of mind in one night. A Christmas Carol has gripped the public imagination since it was first published in 1843, and it is now as much a part of Christmas as mistletoe or plum pudding.

On Friday, December 8 at 12:00, the Library will host a discussion of this beloved classic. Dr. Pete Fraser, professor of film and literature, will lead our conversation. The Library has several copies of the book in print and e-book formats.

The discussion will take place in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are encouraged to join us live via Google Hangouts, Google’s easy-to-use videoconferencing software. Click here to request a link to the discussion.

For the complete 2017-2018 schedule of book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Book Discussion: Renaissance, by Os Guinness

OG_ROn Friday, November 10, at 12:00, the Library Book Club will discuss Renaissance: The Power of the Gospel However Dark the Times, by author, scholar, and journalist, Os Guinness.
About Renaissance, author Rebecca Manley Pippert writes, “This is a profound, realistic and hopeful book that reminds us that even in the darkest times the power of the gospel can change the world…No other writer I know offers such a rich background of astute cultural analysis combined with a deep understanding of history. I finished this book feeling a deep sense of hope, which was fortified by his powerful prayers at the end of each chapter. If we heed the wisdom in this marvelous book, we could well become effective agents for Christ for such a time as this.”

The Library has several copies of Renaissance in print and e-book formats. A video of Dr. Guinness lecturing about his book at the Acton Institute is on YouTube.

Our discussion will take place in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are encouraged to join us live via Google Hangouts, Google’s free, easy-to-use videoconferencing software. Click here to request a link to the discussion.

For the complete 2017-2018 schedule of book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Sign up for RefWorks!

nrwIf you haven’t already, the first week of the October term is the perfect opportunity to register for a RefWorks account.

What is RefWorks?

RefWorks is the world’s premier citation management software. RefWorks allows you to organize citations for all of your research in one easy-to-use online account. The intuitive interface allows you to create folders for all of your projects into which you can export citations for journals, books, and AV items from the Library databases. RefWork’s highly accurate reference generator creates bibliographies in all major styles.

With RefWorks, you will have your own permanent online database of all the research you do at Regent, which you get to keep after graduating – all alumni retain access to their RefWorks accounts after graduating!

To get started with this indispensable resource, login in here and enter your Regent e-mail address so that RefWorks will recognize you as a Regent user. Follow the prompts, and voila! – You will be the proud owner of your own RefWorks account.
Once you have an account, the best thing to do is to watch a few tutorials on RefWorks’ YouTube channel.

From simple bibliographies to papers formatted with in-text citations or footnotes, RefWorks handles it all. Sign up for this tool before your first research project!

Northanger Abbey: Book Discussion with Dr. Carrie White

Mystery! Romance! Dark abbey! (Bright, sunny comedy)

On Thursday, October 26, at 12:00, the Library Book Club will discuss Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen.

Northanger Abbey depicts the misadventures of Catherine Morland, a young, enthusiastic reader of Gothic novels. The romantic tales and dark landscapes feed her imagination. What could be more exciting and remote from the uneventful securities of life in the midland counties of England? But when, ordinary life takes a more sinister turn, circumspection is reaffirmed alongside comedy in Austen’s shortest and most lighthearted work.

Our discussion will take place in the Library Conference Room. Dr. Carrie White will lead our conversation. Whether you’re a confirmed Janeite or just wondering what novels about upper-class English society in the nineteenth century could possibly teach you about life, this event is for you. Austen-appropriate refreshments will be served.

The Library has several copies of Nothanger Abbey in print and e-book formats. Most public library systems also offer the book on CD and downloadable audiobook.

Distance students and faculty are encouraged to join us live via Google Hangouts, Google’s free, easy-to-use videoconferencing software. Click here to request a link to the discussion.
For the complete 2017-2018 schedule of book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Image Credit: https://hauntedhearts.wordpress.com/category/northanger-abbey-by-jane-austen/