Author Archives: Harold Henkel

About Harold Henkel

Associate Librarian

Spring Write-in: Urgent Care for Papers & Projects

On-campus and online Regent students are invited to join the Library’s Spring Write-In event on Tuesday, April 17, 6:00-10:00 EDT.

Work one-on-one with a reference librarian or coach from the University Writing Center. Snacks, destressing stations, and more provided.

For more information, see our event webpage: http://libguides.regent.edu/WriteIn

Celebrating John Wimber’s Legacy

John Wimber (1934-1997) was a principal founder of the Vineyard church movement. Before his radical conversion to Christ in 1963, he was a rock musician with the Righteous Brothers. His ministry brought new expression to the work of the Holy Spirit as witnessed in the more than 1,500 Vineyard churches that exist today worldwide. The Library’s Wimber Collection includes journals, conference materials, course syllabi, Vineyard publications, brochures, newspaper articles, correspondence, and memorabilia.

On Monday, March 12, the Library will host a special event to celebrate the legacy of this man of God. The featured speaker will be the Rev. Christy Wimber, daughter-in-law of John Wimber. The event will take place at 2:00 in the Library auditorium, followed by refreshments on the Library Balcony and an exhibition in Special Collections.
For more information, including a list of speakers and a link to RSVP, see the Wimber Collection Event homepage.

Book Discussion: The Chosen, by Chaim Potok

1st edition cover. Simon & Schuster, 1967

Few stories offer more warmth, wisdom, or generosity than this tale of two boys, their fathers, their friendship, and the chaotic times in which they live. In 1940s Brooklyn, New York, an accident throws Reuven Malther and Danny Saunders together. Together they negotiate adolescence, family conflicts, love, and the journey to adulthood. The intellectual and spiritual clashes between fathers, between each son and his own father, and between the two young men, provide a unique backdrop for this exploration of fathers, sons, faith, loyalty, and, ultimately, the power of love.

On Thursday, March 22 at 12:00, professor of philosophy Dr. Michael Palmer will lead a conversation about this classic coming-of-age novel in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. Contact harohen@regent.edu for a link to the live discussion.

The Library has several copies of The Chosen available for-check-out, as well as DVD and streaming versions of the 1981 film adaptation.

The Library honors Black History Month

Dorothy Hargett, Head of Access Services

In honor of Black History Month, the Library has created three displays featuring both famous and little-known African American inventors. Black History Month has been celebrated in February since 1926 when Dr. Carter G. Woodson launched Negro History month to spotlight the contributions of people of African descent in the United States.

Some African American inventors are well known, such as George Washington Carver, the inventor of peanut butter; and Wally Amos, the founder of Famous Amos Cookies. However, there are also many inventions that we use every day, like the ice cream scoop, the potato chip, and the “Super Soaker” that you may not know were invented by African Americans.

  • Ice Cream Scoop – Alfred L. Cralle (1866–1920) was an African American businessman and inventor who is credited with inventing the ice cream scoop in 1897.
  • Potato Chip – George Crum (1822-1914) is widely credited with the invention of potato chips in 1853. Crum’s birth name was George Speck; he was born in New York in 1822 to Abraham and Catherine Speck. Abraham was African American, and Catherine was a Native American belonging to the Huron tribe.
  • Super Soaker – Lonnie Johnson (b. October 6, 1949) is an American inventor and engineer who holds more than 80 patents but is best known for inventing the Super Soaker water gun, which has ranked among the world’s 20 best-selling toys every year since its release in 1990.

According to Famous Black Inventors, there are many modern conveniences directly related to, or derivative of, the inventions of black inventors, including blood banks, the refrigerator, the electric trolley, clothes dryer, refrigerator, and lawn mower.

The Library displays recognize history-making trailblazers like Dr. Martin Luther King, Maya Angelou, and President Obama. Also featured are classic books and movies to read and watch as you celebrate Black History Month. Come by the Library soon.

A photo album of the displays for Black History Month can be viewed on the Library Facebook page.

Book Discussion: Reformation! Luther Steps Forward

Martin Luther nails the 95 Theses to the door of Wittenberg Cathedral, 31 Oct. 1517. Painting, 1872, by Ferdinand Pauwels.

Since the publication of How the Irish Saved Civilization in 1995, Thomas Cahill has been acclaimed as one of America’s most inviting and evocative scholars of history and culture. In Heretics and Heroes (2013), Cahill surveys the creativity and tumult, the spirituality and violence of the Renaissance and Reformation.

At our meeting on Thursday February 15, we will focus on Chapter 4: “Reformation! Luther Steps Forward.” Dr. Daniel Gilbert, professor of theology and church history, will lead our conversation. The chapter is only 21 pages long, so if you haven’t had time for one of our previous book discussions, this is a great opportunity. The meeting will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Tea and a snack will be served.

For a free copy of the reading, email Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. Contact Harold for a link to the live discussion.