Author Archives: Harold Henkel

About Harold Henkel

Associate Librarian

Hone your Strategic Thinking this Summer

When two tigers fight, what is left is
one dead tiger and one wounded one.
-Chinese Proverb

Traditional Go equipment, made of natural materials like wood, slate, clamshell or white stone, adds to the beauty of the game.

Still looking for a rewarding summer project? Consider learning the ancient game of Go.

Go is a board game that originated in China over 2,500 years ago. Like chess, Go has always been valued as a tool for developing strategic thinking, but the mentalities required for success in the two games could hardly be more different.

Chess is a game of decisive battle. Each player strives to capture the opponent’s king by annihilating his capacity to resist. In contrast, the object of Go is to build and control more territory on the board. While chess tends to reward daring, Go rewards patience.

Unlike chess, which is concerned exclusively with the strategic mentality of warfare, Go is a closer metaphor of business or international relations.. Experience and judgement are essential, and greed is punished.

Go writer Peter Shotwell writes that “Japanese executives learned to look at the national and international corporate worlds as Go boards and designed many of their strategies accordingly…One should try to win, but that had to involve allowing the opponent to win something too, because all-out fights might destroy both competitors.”*

The Library has a good-quality beginning Go set in front of the reference desk. Learning this ancient and rich game will give you insight into the psychology and strategic thinking of countries like China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, where Go is part of the cultural heritage.

Intrigued? Check out this short tutorial on the rules:

https:youtu.begECcsSeRcNo

If you are interested in learning to play Go, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu for suggestions on getting started.

______________________________

*Peter Shotwell, Go! More Than a Game, (Ruland, VT: Tuttle Publishing, 2003), xi.
http:library.regent.edurecord=b1545173~S0

Image Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/494762709037943549/

 

Online Foreign Language Learning

Do you know what foreign language your friends at Regent are learning? Between May 2017 and April 2018, the Regent community studied more and 40 modern and ancient languages courses using the Mango Languages software. 70% of all learning sessions were on mobile devices, with an average session length of 11 minutes, which indicates that a just few dedicated minutes per day is all that is required to make meaningful progress in a foreign language.

Here, by order of registered learners, are the twenty most popular Mango languages at Regent during the past year:

Rank Language Regent Learners
1 Spanish (Latin American) 195
2 Korean 152
3 Japanese 93
4 French 92
5 German 91
6 Hebrew (Modern) 89
7 Italian 87
8 Portuguese (Brazil) 37
9 Chinese (Mandarin) 33
10 Hebrew (Biblical) 30
11 Greek (New Testament) 26
12 Tagalog 24
13 Arabic (Levantine) 22
14 Russian 18
15 Arabic (Egyptian) 12
16 Latin 8
17  Irish 7
18 Greek (Ancient) 5
19 Greek (Modern) 5
20 Romanian 5

Mango offers an amazing array of language and cultural products available 24/7 to current Regent users and alumni, including 72 foreign languages, 17 ESL courses, and special cultural training courses, such as Arab etiquette, Chinese feng shui, and the language of romance in Italy and France. For advanced learners, Mango even has full-length foreign films with subtitles and special learning tools.

Whether you are planning a mission trip to Brazil, getting in touch with your Irish roots, or have always wanted to read the Bible in the original Hebrew and Greek, Mango Languages can help you achieve your goals. Language study is a crucial component for understanding another culture. While complete fluency in a language requires years of study, even basic proficiency will make you feel more at ease when abroad and impress your overseas contacts with your good manners in taking the time to learn some of their language. It will also make your time in a foreign country much more rewarding. As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote, “No man should travel until he has learned the language of the country he visits. Otherwise he voluntarily makes himself a great baby, so helpless and so ridiculous.”

To begin your journey with Mango, click here.

Book Discussion: The Benedict Option, by Rod Dreher

French and American editions of The Benedict Option

In one of the most discussed Christian books of 2017, Rod Dreher calls on American Christians to prepare for the coming Dark Age by embracing the way to St. Benedict of Nursia. At a time of moral chaos, Benedict built  communities based on principles of order, hospitality, stability, and prayer. His spiritual centers of hope were strongholds of light throughout the Dark Ages and saved not only Christianity but Western civilization.

On Thursday, May 24 at 12:00, the Library Book Club will discuss The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation. Professor of Theology Dr. Dale Coulter will lead our discussion.

The Library has multiple copies of the book available for checkout. Reviews and a generous excerpt are available on the publisher’s website.

Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Collaborate Ultra: https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/a48790b68d0642a69e6150250d3bca2d. No Regent login credentials are required to use this link.

Update: Dr. Coulter’s article on The Benedict Option was just published on May 24 in First Things, one of the nation’s leading journals of faith and culture. Read it by clicking here.

Congratulations, Class of 2018!

“The central task of education is to implant a will and a facility for learning; it should produce not learned but learning people. The truly human society is a learning society, where grandparents, parents, and children are students together.” -Eric Hoffer

The Library faculty and staff offer our sincere congratulations to Regent’s Class of 2018. We are honored to have played a role in your accomplishment and would like to take this opportunity to remind you that Regent alumni have lifetime borrowing privileges at the Library. In addition, we are able to offer alumni access to twelve online databases.

To check out materials or use databases, please submit the online Alumni Registration Form

No matter where God’s plan for you leads, the Library will remain at your service for questions and research assistance, including through QuestionPoint, our 24/7 chat reference service.

We also invite our alumni, whether local or distant, to re-connect with the Library through the Book Club. So keep reading, keep learning, and stay in touch!