Category Archives: Special Events

Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

On November 15, the Library inaugurated what it hopes will become a long-standing tradition on campus: a special event to honor faculty authors and formally induct their scholarship into the Library collection.

As this was our first time holding such an event, we included works published from January 2014 through May 2016. The numbers are impressive: 33 books or book chapters by 36 authors, as well as scholarly articles by 49 authors. A total of 82 members of the faculty were honored.

In addition to recognizing all the recent faculty authors, our event featured book talks by two of them: Dr. Joseph Bucci from the College of Arts & Sciences gave an overview of his book Redemptive Leadership: Offering Second Chances as a Value-Added Management Practice, and Dr. Diane Chandler, from the School of Divinity presented some of the main themes in her monograph, Christian Spiritual Formation: An Integrated Approach for Personal and Relational Wholeness.

At the end of the book talks, all monograph authors were invited to inscribe the Library’s copies of their works, and article authors received a special bookmark with the title and publication of their work. In April 2017, we will hold our second Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship to honor faculty publication beginning with June 2016.

Photos from this event may be viewed on our Facebook and Google+ pages.

Book Discussion: The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa, by John Azumah

legacy-arab-islam-in-africaJoin Professor Emeritus Dr. Joseph Kickasola and the Library Book Club on Friday, October 28 for a discussion of an important historical topic that until recently has received too little attention from scholars.

The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa is the first book to document Arab-Islam’s role in the slave trade of Africa. Many books have covered the role of Christians in the slave trade from Africa to the West, but John Azumah, a native of Ghana, is the first scholar to produce a full accounting of the Arab-Muslim role in the enslavement of African peoples. The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa is a must-read for anyone with an interest in the history of the slave trade, which continues to this day in parts of the Islamic world.

Our discussion will take place at 12:00pm in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. The focus will be on chapter 4, “Muslim Slavery and Black Africa.” For a free PDF of this chapter, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

The Library also has four copies of the book available for check-out. The books are located on the Book Club shelf, just to the right of the main staircase.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Library Book Club Reading Schedule 2016-2017

Read literature, and argue the great questions of life with the likes of Leo Tolstoy.

One of the most famous openings in literature is the beginning of Anna Karenina: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Because Tolstoy is one the supreme writers of all time, readers have tended to accept his claim about families as a piece of incontrovertible wisdom. Reader and essayist David P. Goldman, however, argues that Tolstoy got it exactly backwards: “…unhappy families are all unhappy in the same way. It is happy families that are different, because every child is radically unique, such that raising children is the one human activity that is sure to surprise.”*

Goldman’s riposte to Tolstoy brings to mind three reasons on why it is essential that we read literature throughout our lives:

  1. To gain new perspectives, to see the world through other people’s eyes.
  2. To “converse” with the great authors through engagement with their works.
  3. To understand ourselves better.

The mission of the Library Book Club is to encourage the reading of great literature by bringing members of the Regent and CBN communities together to enjoy the unique pleasure of reading and discussing books. For our tenth year, we have assembled a schedule of five classics from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, one acclaimed historical novel about the life of King David, a selection of modern Hebrew poems (our first foray into poetry), a history monograph, and a contemporary memoir. So we hope there’s something for everyone!

Library Book Club Schedule 2016 – 2017

Month Author Title Date & Time
September Geraldine Brooks The Secret Chord Sept 27 at 12:00
October John Allembillah Azumah The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa (Dr. Joseph N. Kickasola, discussion moderator) Oct 28 at 12:00
December Edith Wharton Ethan Frome Dec 9 at 12:00
January Shusaku Endo Silence Jan 31 at 12:00
February Ta-Nehisi Coates Between the World and Me Feb 27 at 12:00
March John Bunyan The Pilgrim’s Progress Mar 31 at 12:00
April Yehuda Amichai The Poetry of Yehuda Amichai (Rabbi Dr. Israel Zoberman, discussion moderator) Apr 21 at 1:00
June Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre June 30 at 12:00
July Elizabeth George Speare The Bronze Bow July 28 at 12:00

Time & Location

Book Club meetings usually take place at noon during the final week of each month in the Library Conference Room. The day of the week depends on the availability and preference of readers. To request a day, send an e-mail message to Harold Henkel (harohen@regent.edu). Check the events tab on the Library Facebook Group for confirmed dates and times. Tea and refreshments are served, and participants are welcome to bring a lunch.

Distance students and faculty welcome

Distance students and faculty are invited to join discussions via Google Hangouts, Google’s free videoconferencing service. Here is the permanent link for all Library Hangout events: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

For more information about the Book Club, see our website or contact Harold Henkel.

_________________________________________

*David P. Goldman, “Thanks, but I already have a novel,” Asia Times Online, January 29, 2013, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Front_Page/OA29Aa01.html.

Book Discussion: Far from the Madding Crowd, by Thomas Hardy

far-from-the-madding-crowd-cover-imageLooking for a great love story this summer? Then read Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd with the Library Book Club. In 2007, the British newspaper The Guardian ranked Thomas Hardy’s impassioned tale of courtship and rural English life #10 in its ranking of the 100 greatest love stories of all time.

Far from the Madding Crowd was Thomas Hardy’s first major literary success and remains one of his most popular works. Set against the backdrop of the unchanging natural cycle of the year, the novel is permeated with classical and Biblical allusions.

The Library has print and e-book versions of the book available for check-out. Our discussion of  will take place on Thursday, July 14 at 1:00pm in the Library Conference Room. An English snack (and of course, tea) will be served. We will also view clips of the 1967 and 2015 film adaptations of the novel.

Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via our Google Hangouts link. For more information about this or other Book Club events, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Book Discussion: A Pigeon and a Boy, by Meir Shalev

207333

U.S. edition, 2007

Meir Shalev is one of Israel’s most acclaimed novelists, whose works have been translated into more than twenty languages. The subjects of A Pigeon and a Boy are two of the most powerful human desires: love and home.

The title of the novel refers to a courier pigeon handler serving in the fledgling Israeli army during the War for Independence in 1948. For the author, the courier pigeon becomes a symbol of the human longing to return to one’s home. A Pigeon and a Boy intertwines and connects the stories of two couples: one from the 1940s and one from contemporary Jerusalem.

Original Israeli edition, 2006

Original Israeli edition, 2006

To help us explore this captivating work, Rabbi Dr. Israel Zoberman will lead our discussion. Rabbi Zoberman grew up in Israel in the 1950s and will provide insights into life in Israel in the early years following Independence. As readers who have attended previous Book Club discussions with him can attest, he is a terrific scholar, teacher and story-teller.

The discussion will take place on Thursday, April 14 at 1:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For information about future book discussions at the Library, see the Library Book Club webpage.