Category Archives: Special Events

Special Book Talk: One Hundred Pieces of Sun, by C. L. Kennedy

Mali: The Niger River, which the author crossed using local transportation in 1969.

Mali: The Niger River, which the author crossed using local transportation in 1971.

Author, educator, and public school reformer Dr. C. L. Kennedy’s memoir, One Hundred Pieces of Sun, charts a trajectory from her childhood in the Jim Crow Alabama of the 1950s and a not-exactly-equal-rights city in the Rust-Belt, to Sarah Lawrence College. The book ends with her junior year abroad at the University of Ghana, followed by travels through Africa using only local transportation. (Yes, her mother threw a fit when she first told her about her plans.) One Hundred Pieces of Sun is infused with the author’s enthusiasm for life and delivers a powerful, inspiring message: Have faith in God and yourself, be brave, and follow your dreams!

On Friday, February 24 at 12:00 in RH 105, Dr. Kennedy will present a reading and discussion of her book. A pizza lunch will be served. RSVP by clicking “going” on our Facebook event page or by e-mailing harohen@regent.edu.

For more about the book and three short excerpts, see the review on the Library blog.

Book Discussion: Silence, by Shusaku Endo

“Christ did not die for the good and beautiful. It is easy enough to die for the good and beautiful; the hard thing is to die for the miserable and corrupt.”
― Shūsaku Endō, Silence

Japanese 1st edition of Silence (1966)

Japanese 1st edition of Silence (1966)

Shusaku Endo (1923-1996) was a Japanese Roman Catholic novelist. Silence, first published in 1966, has been hailed as Endo’s masterpiece and one of the most significant Christian novels of the twentieth century. To coincide with the January release of Martin Scorsese’s long-awaited film of Silence, the Library Book Club will begin 2017 with this book.

The subject of Silence is the persecution of Japanese Christians in the seventeenth century. In 1637, two Portuguese missionaries undertake a perilous search for their missing Jesuit tutor. The Shogun and Samurai have purged Japan of Western influence, rooting out Christians and subjecting them to torture until they renounce the word of God. Father Rodrigues knows that if they are discovered, they face the same brutal treatment as the Christian peasantry. The deeper Rodrigues journeys into Japan, the more he finds himself questioning the meaning of God’s silence in answer to their prayers and to the suffering of the Japanese Christians.

The Book Club’s discussion of Silence will take place on Tuesday, January 31 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Dale Coulter, professor of historical theology in the School of Divinity, will lead our conversation. Dr. Coulter has just published his reflections on Endo’s work in the influential journal of religion and culture First Things.

The Library has multiple copies of Silence. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

During January, the Library is also hosting an exhibition of artifacts associated with the persecution of Christians in Japan as well as responsive works by Makoto Fujimura. The works in this exhibition were on display last fall at Wheaton College, which is still hosting photos and outstanding explanatory materials on its website.

Book Discussion: Ethan Frome, by Edith Wharton

efAt only 100 pages (Penguin edition), Ethan Frome may be the shortest masterpiece in American literature.

Edith Wharton’s tale of forbidden emotions is set on a New England farm in the first decade of the twentieth century. Ethan Frome works and struggles to maintain a bearable existence with his suspicious and hypochondriac wife, Zeenie. But when Zeenie’s vivacious cousin enters their household as a “hired girl,” Ethan finds himself obsessed with her and the dream of happiness she comes to represent. In one of American fiction’s most intense narratives, Wharton moves the ill-starred characters toward their tragic destinies.

On Friday, December 9, professor of literature and film Pete Fraser will moderate a discussion of Ethan Frome. The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. We will also view a clip from the 1993 film adaptation starring Liam Neeson, Patricia Arquette, and Joan Allen. The Library has multiple print and electronic copies of the book.

Distance students and faculty are invited to us via Google Hangouts.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

On November 15, the Library inaugurated what it hopes will become a long-standing tradition on campus: a special event to honor faculty authors and formally induct their scholarship into the Library collection.

As this was our first time holding such an event, we included works published from January 2014 through May 2016. The numbers are impressive: 33 books or book chapters by 36 authors, as well as scholarly articles by 49 authors. A total of 82 members of the faculty were honored.

In addition to recognizing all the recent faculty authors, our event featured book talks by two of them: Dr. Joseph Bucci from the College of Arts & Sciences gave an overview of his book Redemptive Leadership: Offering Second Chances as a Value-Added Management Practice, and Dr. Diane Chandler, from the School of Divinity presented some of the main themes in her monograph, Christian Spiritual Formation: An Integrated Approach for Personal and Relational Wholeness.

At the end of the book talks, all monograph authors were invited to inscribe the Library’s copies of their works, and article authors received a special bookmark with the title and publication of their work. In April 2017, we will hold our second Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship to honor faculty publication beginning with June 2016.

Photos from this event may be viewed on our Facebook and Google+ pages.

Book Discussion: The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa, by John Azumah

legacy-arab-islam-in-africaJoin Professor Emeritus Dr. Joseph Kickasola and the Library Book Club on Friday, October 28 for a discussion of an important historical topic that until recently has received too little attention from scholars.

The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa is the first book to document Arab-Islam’s role in the slave trade of Africa. Many books have covered the role of Christians in the slave trade from Africa to the West, but John Azumah, a native of Ghana, is the first scholar to produce a full accounting of the Arab-Muslim role in the enslavement of African peoples. The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa is a must-read for anyone with an interest in the history of the slave trade, which continues to this day in parts of the Islamic world.

Our discussion will take place at 12:00pm in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. The focus will be on chapter 4, “Muslim Slavery and Black Africa.” For a free PDF of this chapter, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

The Library also has four copies of the book available for check-out. The books are located on the Book Club shelf, just to the right of the main staircase.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.