Category Archives: Feedback Express

What is Special Collections?

What is Special Collections? (And why is it locked up?)

by Jason Stuart, Reference Librarian

In 2013, Special Collections hosted the Living Word exhibition of ancient Biblical manuscripts.

In 2013, Special Collections hosted the Living Word exhibition of ancient Biblical manuscripts.

The University Library’s Special Collections & Archives are a treasure trove of unique primary source materials and artifacts. Researchers have travelled from all over the United States and Great Britain to unlock the secrets of our vault.

Although the Library’s Special Collections is becoming an important destination for 20th Century Christian history research, the 2014 Customer Satisfaction Survey suggests that most students are unaware of Special Collections. Here are two of the comments we received:

  • “I have not used this service.”
  • “What is Special Collections? Isn’t that the area that’s always closed off and unavailable?”
The Greek amphora in Special Collections has been dated approximately to the time of Christ.

The Greek amphora in Special Collections has been dated approximately to the time of Christ.

So what exactly is in there? Just a few of the highlights include the John Wimber Collection, the Rev. Dennis J. Bennett Papers, and the William Standish Reed, M.D., Collection. All three of these men were important leaders in the Charismatic / Renewal Movements of the mid-to-late 20th Century. The archives contain memorabilia and documents chronicling the history of CBN and Regent University. Some of the other notable artifacts include a collection of early English printed Bibles and a 2,000-year-old Greek amphora.

Items from Special Collections & Archives show up in search results from the Library’s catalog and One Search. Since these materials are rare, unique, and often priceless, they are locked away to protect them from thieves (sticky-fingered scholars included), as well as the damaging effects of light, humidity, and other environmental hazards.

If you would like to conduct research in Special Collections or simply want to view some of the treasures housed there, contact a member of the Special Collections staff. For more information about this service, including an introductory video, policies, and contact information, see our Special Collections webpages.

The Library doesn’t have what I need!

by Melody Detar, Divinity Librarian

But I need that article!

But I need that article!

Nearly all students have experienced the frustration of learning about a book or article that is perfectly suited for their research – only to discover the Library does not own it. On the 2014 Customer Satisfaction Survey, we received several comments from students who have experienced this situation, such as these:

  • “As I can only access the e-version, there are many resources which I need that are not available online.”
  • “The Library has a great selection of resources; however it doesn’t always have the journal publications or books that I’ve needed for my research.”
  • “The databases don’t always pull up the articles needed for research.”

So when you are conducting research and discover a book that would be perfect for your project or an article with a citation but no full text, what should you do? Here are some tips:

When you can’t find the full-text for an article:
Sometimes, you may come across information about a journal article in one database, but find that it does not have the full text. The Full Text Journal Finder is a tool for determining whether the Regent University Library has the full-text of a particular periodical (journal, magazine, or newspaper) in any of our 170+ databases. Simply type the name of the journal (not the article) in the search bar to see if and where the periodical is available in our online databases or in print.

When you need a book or article not in the Regent Library:
If you need a book that is not in our catalog, or an article from a periodical that does not show up in the Full Text Journal Finder, request it through InterLibrary Loan (ILL). In most cases, our ILL team can procure the articles you need and deliver them to you in PDF in 1-2 business days. Most book requests take under a week to fulfill. Distance students can also use ILL to have books shipped from the Regent Library to their home at no charge. The only cost to you is to ship them back if you will not be visiting the Regent campus before the due date. (Keep in mind, we allow up to five renewals as long as they are not needed by another patron.) Distance students may now request that up to two books per term be shipped to them from libraries other than Regent.

The librarians are committed to supporting the research and studies of the Regent community, so if there is a book or journal that supports your long-term research projects or teaching, let us know! We understand that borrowing items via ILL is sufficient for many course projects, but major research projects or new courses necessitate that we have the book on hand. We are happy to take requests for book and journal purchases here.

Image Credit: Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest, “Frustrated Irish girl looking at computer,” accessed 11 Mar 2015, http://quest.eb.com/search/154_2893513/1/154_2893513/cite

Research Liaisons: At Your Service

by Sara Baron, Ed.D., Dean of the University Library

Many people start their library research with the indefatigable Google. However, in the library world we agree with author Neil Gaiman that, “Google can bring you back 100,000 answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.”

On the 2015 Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), we received several comments from students who are not sure where to turn with discipline-specific research problems. Here are two sample remarks:

  • “[The reference service] was somewhat helpful, but I think I kept asking librarians for source advice in subjects they weren’t as familiar with.”
  • “[Just] like students have an academic adviser, give each student an academic librarian that they can go to for help on particularly difficult projects, so they have a friend at the library.”

Yes, you have a friend at the Library. For each discipline at Regent, there is a Library Liaison who specializes in research in that subject and can help you find the best possible information for your projects. See the table below to find the research specialist in your discipline. Feel free to contact them directly or request help through our Ask a Librarian page. Whether student or faculty, your Library liaisons are standing by to help you succeed at Regent.

Students:

Research has shown that students with a GPA of 3.5 and higher frequently state that working with a librarian has helped them succeed.1 Library liaisons will:

  • Save you time by directing you to the best resources.
  • Meet with you online (Skype or Google Hangouts), over the phone, or in person.
  • Help you develop information finding and evaluating skills that will serve you well in your academic and professional careers.

Faculty:

Are you aware of the services your Library liaisons provide? These include:

  • Acquiring resources for your research and classes.
  • Developing research guides for your courses, or even a particular assignment, such as a big research project.
  • Teaching your students research skills in your classroom, in the Library, or online.
  • Helping you embed Library tools into your Blackboard courses.

A study published in Libraries and the Academy found that university faculty consider four functions of their libraries’ liaison program to be especially important:2

  1. Communicating with teaching faculty.
  2. Providing library services.
  3. Responding to faculty requests.
  4. Providing research expertise in the discipline.

The Library liaisons at Regent provide all these services and more!

Regent University Library Liaison Responsibilities for Instruction, Developing Research Guides, and Collection Development – 2014-2015:

Disciplines (Undergraduate & Graduate)

Library Faculty

Business & Leadership

Business Administration, Organizational Leadership, Strategic Leadership, Business, Leadership Studies, Economics

Harold Henkel

Communication

Communication, Cinema-TV, Journalism, Theatre, Animation

Instruction & Research Guides
Harold Henkel

 Collection Development
Sara Baron

Divinity

Practical Theology, Theological Studies, Divinity, Ministry, Renewal Studies, Biblical and Theological Studies, Christian Ministry, Theology, Youth Ministry

Melody Detar

Education

All programs, including: Curriculum & Instruction (including Curriculum Collection), School Administration, Higher Education, English Secondary Education, Interdisciplinary Studies (PreK-6 teacher licensure), Math Secondary Education

Sandy Yaegle

English

Harold Henkel

Foreign Languages/Studies

Hispanic Studies, French & Spanish

Instruction
Harold Henkel

Research Guides &
Collection Development
Georgi Bordner

Government

Government, Public Administration, International Studies, American Government & Politics, Homeland & International Security, International Relations & Foreign Policy, Political Philosophy

Jason Stuart

History

Harold Henkel

Information Systems Technology, Mathematics,

Biophysical Sciences

Jason Stuart

Psychology & Counseling

Human Services Counseling, Psychology, Criminal Justice

Instruction & Research Guides

Psyc/Coun- Sandy Yaegle

CJ- Jason Stuart

Collection Development
Sara Baron

_________________________________

1Steven Bell, “Keep Them Enrolled: How Academic Libraries Contribute to Student Retention,” Library Issues, 29, no. 1 (2008), http://www.libraryissues.com/sub/PDF2901Sep2008.pdf.

2Julie Arendt and Megan Lotts, “What Liaisons Say about Themselves and What Faculty Say about Their Liaisons, a U.S. Survey,” Libraries and the Academy 12, no. 2 (2012), http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v012/12.2.arendt.html.

Easy eBooks

by Sandra Yaegle, Head of Public Services

Feedback Express

Each year on the Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), we receive comments from students who like ebooks (and would like us to buy more) and from others who find them difficult to use and wish we would just stick with printed copies. Here are two comments from the 2014 CSS:

  • “It will help students tremendously with papers, if the library has more ebooks available.”
  • “Reading ebooks is difficult and not user friendly. Having a real book is much nicer, and I have used a purchased book rather than use the ebook.”

The Library currently has over 300,000 ebooks in the collection, and it is becoming easier to find and read them. The first thing you may be asking is how to locate them. The best way to search for ebooks is to use either the Library Catalog or One Search. See our Locating e-Books page for tips on using the Catalog or One Search to find e-books.

All of our e-book collections provide the same full-text access as the printed version. Most of our ebooks also allow you the option of reading online or downloading it to your computer or mobile device. Our Downloading eBooks page has video tutorials that will show you how to do this.

Although nothing quite replaces the feel and smell of paper and ink, ebooks have some nifty features of their own: Some of our ebooks allow you to take notes, look up words in a dictionary, or search for key words or topics inside the book.

For a complete list of ebook collections in the Library, see our ebook Collections page. For your convenience, this page also lists free ebook and audiobook sites on the Web

“There is absolutely no difference between a hardcover book or an audiobook or a multimedia book application. There is no difference between a high quality paper or e-ink screen or a high-resolution Retina display. The biggest pleasure comes from what we read, not from on what we read.”*

Happy reading.

_______________________________

*Piotr Kowalczyk, “50 Most Inspiring Quotes about Books and Reading” Ebook Friendly, 2015, http://ebookfriendly.com/best-quotes-books-reading/.