Category Archives: Extra! Extra!

New Microforms Scanner debuts at Library

Following months of heated anticipation, the Library is proud to announce the installation of its new microfilm reader and scanner.

ST ViewScan III is one of the most advanced microfilm scanners available today and brings the Library’s considerable microforms collections (microfilm, microfiche, and ultrafiche) into the digital era. The machine allows users to crop and save only the sections of a document they want as well as clean up any scratches that may be present on the film. Users have the option to print, email, or save their work to a flash drive.

While the machine will likely get its heaviest use from our InterLibrary Loan department in fulfilling requests for articles on microfilm, all Library researchers are welcome to use it. ViewScan is loaded with several video tutorials to get you started, and the Library staff and student assistants can also assist you.

So if you’ve always wanted to wade into the exciting world of microforms research, your time has come!

Summer Reading at the Library

For the second straight summer, the Library Book Club has selected two beloved classics for adults and younger readers.

Sterling Hundley, “The Captain”

On June 25, Dr. Peter Fraser will lead a discussion of Treasure Island, one of the most popular and influential adventure stories of all time. Besides being the most ingenious of all pirate tales, the work is a coming-of-age novel, whose hero grows from an easily frightened and impulsive boy at the beginning to a brave and circumspect young man by the story’s end.

On July 30, we will discuss Little Women, one of the most revered American novels. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott’s most autobiographical work, tells the story of the formation and coming of age of four sisters in New England during the second half of the nineteenth century.

Rebecca Green, "Jo Writing"

Rebecca Green, “Jo Writing”

Our book discussions will take place from 12:00 to 1:00 in the Library Conference Room. We are especially eager to have younger readers participate! As always, distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For more information about these events or the Library Book Club, contact Harold Henkel at 757-352-4198 or

Image Credits:

Sterling Hundley (illustrator), “The Captain,” Treasure Island, The Folio Society website,

Rebecca Green (illustrator), “Jo Writing,” Little Women, The Folio Society website,

Alumni benefits at the Library

The Library faculty and staff offer our sincere congratulations to all new graduates of Regent University. We are honored to have played a role in your accomplishment and would like to take this opportunity to remind you that Regent alumni have lifetime borrowing privileges at the Library. In addition, we are able to offer alumni access to fourteen online databases. So no matter where the future takes you, keep us in mind for your information needs.

To check out materials or use databases, please submit the online Alumni Registration Form. Processing may take up to five business days for verification and approval. For more information, please see the Services for Alumni page.

Library display honors the life and work of Maya Angelou

by Ellen Cox, Business Manager & Special Projects Assistant

Photos of the display can be viewed on our Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Photos of the display can be viewed on our Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Maya Angelou’s 1969 autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, brought the author instant recognition. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou was raised in Stamps, Arkansas by her grandmother. She had a very traumatic childhood, but with her grandmother’s care she survived to become one of the most significant American authors of the twentieth century. Angelou had a varied career, including street car conductor, actress, and dancer. She had only one child—a son—born to her when she was sixteen.

In addition to her bestselling autobiographies, including I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and The Heart of a Woman, she wrote numerous volumes of poetry. She was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in poetry and received the National Medal of Arts in 2000, the Lincoln Medal in 2008, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011.

Maya Angelou died on May 28, 2014, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she lived and attended Mt. Zion Baptist Church. She is outstanding not because she was privileged, but because of her grace under fire. Her lifetime achievements were born out of adversity and struggle. She represents the best of people who overcome prejudice to nurture their unique gifts and to become what God intended them to be.

In recognition of Maya Angelou’s accomplishments, the Library has created a display of her significant works from our collection. The display is located to the left of the reference desk and can also be viewed on the Library’s Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Learn time-saving skills at our Research Lifesavers workshops.

Lifesavers® advertisement, 1948

Lifesavers® advertisement, 1948

On Thursday, January 29 at 12:00, the reference librarians will offer a luncheon workshop about basic resources on the Library website that everyone should know about. Enjoy a pizza lunch on us and learn easy-to-use techniques that will save you time in the research process.

The workshop will be held in the Library Conference Room. Reserve your place by “joining” this event on Facebook, Google+, or by e-mailing Stephanie Lowell at

Online Session

A live, online version of this workshop will be held on Thursday, February 5 at 6:00 pm EDT. We will meet via Google Hangouts On Air. Make sure to log into your account or a personal gmail account if you want to ask questions during the workshop. Here is the link to the Google+ events page where you can get in to watch:

Reserve your place at the online session by joining on Facebook, Google+ or by e-mailing Jason Stuart at