Go comes to the Library Reference Desk

When two tigers fight, what is left is
one dead tiger and one wounded one.
-Chinese Proverb

Expand your horizons by learning Go.

Expand your horizons by learning Go.

Go (Chinese: wéiqí, Japanese: igo, Korean: baduk, common meaning: “surrounding game”) is a board game that originated in China more than 2,500 years ago. Go is widely understood to occupy the position in China, Japan, and Korea that chess does in the West.

Go and chess are both preeminently games of strategy, but the nature of play and the temperament required for success could hardly be more different: While the object of chess is to checkmate the opponent’s king, the object of Go is to control more territory on the board. Chess favors daring and calculation, Go patience and judgment.

It has become widely appreciated in the West that that some understanding and experience with Go can provide insights into the psychology and strategic thinking of countries where Go is part of the cultural heritage. Peter Shotwell, for example, writes that “Japanese executives learned to look at the national and international corporate worlds as Go boards and designed many of their strategies accordingly…One should try to win, but that had to involve allowing the opponent to win something too, because all-out fights might destroy both competitors.”*

The Library has placed a Go set on the Reference Desk that we hope will act as a catalyst for some of our patrons to learn about this rich and even beautiful game. Go will not only teach you another way of looking at strategy and success, but also provide an experience of one of the great arts of China, Japan, and Korea.

Intrigued? Check out this trailer for a forthcoming documentary about Go:

If you are interested in learning to play Go, contact Harold Henkel at 757-352-4198 or harohen@regent.edu for suggestions on getting started.

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*Peter Shotwell, Go! More Than a Game, (Ruland, VT: Tuttle Publishing, 2003), xi. http://library.regent.edu/record=b1545173~S0

Book Club reading Their Eyes Were Watching God

1st edition, published by J.B. Lippincott, September 18, 1937.

1st edition, published by J.B. Lippincott, September 18, 1937.

By the time of her death in 1960, Zora Neale Hurston’s literary work was falling out of fashion with critics because it did not seem to fit in anywhere with the civil rights movement or the politics of oppressed peoples. Owing to the author’s impoverished circumstances, she was buried in an unmarked grave in Fort Pierce, Florida. Today Hurston is regarded as one of the greatest American novelists of the twentieth century and a unique voice in the history of African-American literature.

As part of the Library’s celebration of Black History Month, the Book Club is reading Their Eyes Were Watching God, considered by many readers to be her masterwork. Set in central and southern Florida in the 1930s, Their Eyes Were Watching God combines Black folklore and dialect to tell a story at once realistic and mythic. While frequently labeled an “African American feminist classic,” “the syncopated beauty of Hurston’s prose, her remarkable gift for comedy, the sheer visceral terror of the book’s climax, all transcend any label that critics have tried to put on this remarkable work.”*

The Library owns four copies of the book (click here and here to check for availability), which is also a National Endowment for the Arts Big Read selection. An excellent reader’s guide to the novel is available on the Big Read website.

The discussion will take place on Thursday, February 27 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join us via Google Hangouts. Here is the Library’s permanent link for all Hangout events: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

For more information about the Library Book Club, including a current schedule, see our new webpage or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

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*National Endowment for the Arts website, http://www.neabigread.org/books/theireyes/.

Feedback Express: More signs, please!

Signs should look like this...

Signs should look like this…

For the past couple of years, a number of Library patrons have commented that finding one’s way around the Library was not as easy as it should be. The following comments from the 2013 Customer Satisfaction Survey are representative:

  • “Have more signs indicating there are more books upstairs, because the first time I ever looked for a book I got extremely confused.”
  • “It would be helpful if signage for call letters was more prominent on the first and second floors. For example, can signs with what call letters/numbers are on each floor be placed near the computers on the first floor as well as on the shelf ends and the entrance to the stairs and elevator? If they are there, I haven’t seen them.”
...not like this.

…not like this.

After studying all the suggestions we have received in recent years on surveys or placed at the circulation desk, we have fulfilled as many of these requests as possible without turning our interior space into a Library version of this. Lead Maintenance Specialist Sam Brownell has created many new signs that are intuitively placed around the Library to catch the eye without being intrusive.

To further enhance the navigation experience, we are in the process of making a full-colored tri-fold map that will soon be available at the circulation desk. Please communicate any suggestions for further signage on our online comments form.

 Image credits:

Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest, “Post Office With Guidance Signage In The City Of Sciences, Valencia, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain.”, accessed 7 Feb 2014, http://0-quest.eb.com.library.regent.edu/images/164_3248929

Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest, “Signage”, accessed 7 Feb 2014, http://0-quest.eb.com.library.regent.edu/images/111_1504275

Click here to use Image Quest, where you can choose from more than 3 million top-quality images (complete with citations) like these for your projects.

Book Discussion: The Namesake re-scheduled for February 6

Bengali edition of The Namesake

Bengali edition of The Namesake

Note: This post reflects the re-scheduled book discussion of The Namesake, necessitated by last week’s snow storm.

On Thursday February 6, the Library Book Club will discuss The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri’s novel about a Bengali couple from Calcutta and their American-born children. The Namesake is a story about the American immigrant experience: the conflicted feelings of ambition and nostalgia by the immigrant generation and the ambivalence of their children who are expected to embrace the new homeland while feeling a connection to a country where they have never lived. At the same time, the novel is alive with the smells and tastes of Indian cooking, traditional customs and holidays, and even every-day information about Bengali pedagogy, such as the way children learn to form letters of the complex alphabet as if they “hang from a bar.”

The Library owns three copies of the book, which is also a National Endowment for the Arts Big Read selection. An excellent reader’s guide to the novel is available on the Big Read website.

The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. An Indian snack will be served. Distance students and faculty are invited to join us via Google Hangouts. Here is the Library’s permanent link for all Hangout events: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

For more information about the Library Book Club, including a current schedule, see our new webpage.

Library highlights publications by Psychology & Counseling faculty

by Ellen Cox, Business Manager & Special Projects Assistant

The Library is pleased to feature recent articles and books by faculty of the School of Psychology and Counseling. The works displayed are representative of the important scholarship published over the years by Psychology and Counseling faculty.

According to SPC Dean William Hathaway, “The scholarship activities in the SPC have received national and global attention in both counseling and psychology. While they have been rigorous enough for acceptance in first tier scholarly venues, they have also frequently had a direct real world impact. From helping ministers and counselors in Haiti more effectively deal with traumatized children to helping pastors better strengthen marriages, the SPC research is demonstrating internationally recognized Christian leadership that is changing the world.”

Among the featured publications is a copy of the Korean language edition of Family Therapies: A Comprehensive Christian Appraisal, by Dr. James Sells. Other notable books and articles include works by Dr. Glen Moriarty, Dr. Donald Walker, Linda Baum, Dr. Jennifer Ripley, Dr. Mark Newmeyer, Dr. Kathie Erwin, Dr. Mark Yarhouse, and Dean William Hathaway.

Stop by the University Library to review these outstanding works (the display is located on the first floor, near the gallery area), and be sure to congratulate these fine professors on their achievements.