Tag Archives: Book Club

Library Book Club 2017-2018 Schedule

Painting by Sister Isabella Guerra (see image credit below).

The Library Book Club is excited to announce announce its tenth year of book talks and discussions, featuring works chosen to give pleasure, and just maybe, a little instruction. As always, we have tried to select a list that will appeal to a variety of interests, with both classic and contemporary fiction as well as thought-provoking works of non-fiction.

This year we begin with something truly different. As a tie-in to Regent’s Movie on the Lawn showing of Wonder Woman on September 16, the Book Club is sponsoring a discussion on approaching the film from a Christian perspective. Dr. Pete Fraser, professor of film and literature, will lead our conversation. This special event will take place on Friday, September 22

Here it the complete schedule for 2017-2018:

Month Author Title Date & Time
September Patty Jenkins, director Wonder Woman Sept 22, 2:00
October Jane Austen Northanger Abbey Oct 6, 12:00
November Os Guinness Renaissance: The Power of the Gospel However Dark the Times Nov 10, 12:00
 December Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Dec 8, 12:00
January Thomas Cahill Heretics and Heroes: How Renaissance Artists and Reformation Priests Created Our World Feb 2,
12:00
February Chaim Potok The Chosen Mar 2, 12:00
March-April Rod Dreher

The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation

Week of Apr 9. Date & Time TBD

As always, it is not necessary to complete the book in order to come to a discussion. The overriding purpose of the Library Book Club is to encourage members of the Regent and CBN communities to make time in their schedules for reading. For more information about the Library Book Club, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu. If you would like to receive announcements of upcoming discussions and events, follow the Library on Facebook or Google+.

Image Credit: Painting by Sister Isabella Guerra, a nun at the Cistercian monastery of Santa Lucia, Zaragoza in Spain. For information about Sister Isabella and examples of her work, see Lines and Colors (blog) at http://linesandcolors.com/2011/11/13/isabel-guerra/.

John Marcellus Huston

Book Discussion: The Bronze Bow, by Elizabeth George Speare

The_Bronze_Bow_coverThe Bronze Bow, by Elizabeth George Speare, tells the story of eighteen-year-old Daniel bar Jamin, a young Jewish Zealot bent on revenging his father’s death by driving the Romans out of the land of Israel. Daniel’s hatred for Romans wanes only when he starts to hear the teaching of the traveling carpenter, Jesus of Nazareth. The Bronze Bow, which won the Newberry Medal in 1962, is a moving work for young and adult readers alike.

On Friday, July 28 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room, The Library Book Club will discuss this widely-admired Christian novel. Younger readers are especially welcome to join our discussion! The Library has several copies of the book available for checkout.

For more information, contact Harold Henkel at 352-4198 or harohen@regent.edu.

Summer Reading at the Library

JaneEyreOne of the ironies of academic life is how challenging it can be to find time to read for pleasure. If you have been meaning to set aside those peer-reviewed journal articles for a few minutes per day to read something just for enjoyment, the Library Book Club invites you to join us this summer for two beloved classics for adults and younger readers.

Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë’s masterpiece, has been “teaching true strength of character for generations” (The Guardian). One of the greatest of all bildungsromane, Jane Eyre has taught life lessons to generations of readers through its story of a young woman’s quest for freedom.

The_Bronze_Bow_coverThe Bronze Bow, by Elizabeth George Speare, tells the story of eighteen-year-old Daniel bar Jamin, a young man bent on revenging his father’s death by driving the Romans out of the land of Israel. Daniel’s hatred for Romans wanes only when he starts to hear the teaching of the traveling carpenter, Jesus of Nazareth.

Our Jane Eyre discussion will take place on June 30 and The Bronze Bow discussion on July 28. Both meetings will take place from 12:00 to 1:00 in the Library Conference Room. We are especially eager to have younger readers participate, so please pass the word to middle and high school students in your acquaintance. As always, distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For more information about these events, contact Harold Henkel at 757-352-4198 or harohen@regent.edu.

Book Discussion with Rabbi Dr. Israel Zoberman

Yehuda_Amichai_2.inddYehuda Amichai (1924-2000) wrote in colloquial Hebrew and is widely regarded as the finest poet of modern Israel. Many of Amichai’s poems are remarkably accessible, vivid in their evocation of landscape and historical predicament. He also created some of the most moving love poems written in any language in the past two generations: some exuberant, some erotic, and some suffused with sadness over separation.

Rabbi Dr. Israel Zoberman has selected eight poems for our conversation from the 2015 collection edited by Robert Alter. For your own free copy of the poems, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

The discussion will be held on Friday, April 21 at 1:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

Over the years, Rabbi Zoberman’s annual spring visit has become an anticipated event at the Library. He is a scholar, teacher, and raconteur about Israel, history, and literature. This year, you need read only eight poems to qualify as prepared, so don’t miss this cultural opportunity!

Book Discussion: Ethan Frome, by Edith Wharton

efAt only 100 pages (Penguin edition), Ethan Frome may be the shortest masterpiece in American literature.

Edith Wharton’s tale of forbidden emotions is set on a New England farm in the first decade of the twentieth century. Ethan Frome works and struggles to maintain a bearable existence with his suspicious and hypochondriac wife, Zeenie. But when Zeenie’s vivacious cousin enters their household as a “hired girl,” Ethan finds himself obsessed with her and the dream of happiness she comes to represent. In one of American fiction’s most intense narratives, Wharton moves the ill-starred characters toward their tragic destinies.

On Friday, December 9, professor of literature and film Pete Fraser will moderate a discussion of Ethan Frome. The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. We will also view a clip from the 1993 film adaptation starring Liam Neeson, Patricia Arquette, and Joan Allen. The Library has multiple print and electronic copies of the book.

Distance students and faculty are invited to us via Google Hangouts.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.