Tag Archives: Book Club

Finding time to read: a parable about Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt...real reader

TR…real reader

“Once upon a time in the dead of winter in the Dakota Territory, Theodore Roosevelt took off in a makeshift boat down the Little Missouri River in pursuit of a couple of thieves who had stolen his prized rowboat. After several days on the river, he caught up and got the draw on them with his trusty Winchester, at which point they surrendered. Then Roosevelt set off in a borrowed wagon to haul the thieves cross-country to justice. They headed across the snow-covered wastes of the Badlands to the railhead at Dickinson, and Roosevelt walked the whole way, the entire 40 miles. It was an astonishing feat, what might be called a defining moment in Roosevelt’s eventful life. But what makes it especially memorable is that during that time, he managed to read all of Anna Karenina. I often think of that when I hear people say they haven’t time to read.”*

This spring, the Library Book Club invites the Regent and CBN community to devote 20-30 minutes per day to reading literature and to rediscover the pleasure of sharing ideas about books by joining us at our book discussions. The reading schedule is comprised of two great classics and two highly acclaimed contemporary works. All four of titles can be read with as little a commitment as twenty minutes per day, although completing the book is not a requirement for attending the meeting.

Discuss great books books on your lunch hour.

Except for April, all discussions will take place at noon on the final Thursday of the month in the Library Conference Room. Check the events tab of our Facebook or Google+ page for any updates. Tea and refreshments are served, and participants are welcome to bring a lunch.

Distance students and faculty can participate.

Distance students and faculty may join our discussions via Google Hangouts, Google’s free videoconferencing service. Here is the Library’s permanent link for all Hangout events: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

For more information about the Library Book Club, see our webpage or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

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*David McCullough, “No Time to Read,” quoted in Connect: College Reading, 2nd edition, by Ivan G. Dole and Leslie Taggart. (Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning, 2012), 474.

Library Book Club Schedule Spring 2014

Month Author Title Date & Time
January Henry James Washington Square
January 28 at 12:00
February Toni Morrison Beloved February 25 at 12:00
April Meir Shalev A Pigeon and a Boy
April 14 at 1:00
June Thomas Hardy Far from the Madding Crowd June 30 at 12:00
 “It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.” ― C.S. Lewis


“It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.”
― C.S. Lewis

 

Dr. Eric Patterson to lead discussion of The Far Side of the World

CapeHorn2_JPG

“…and presently [Cape Horn] was in sight from the deck, not so much land as the world’s grim end, a tall blackness on the rim of the sea that continually flashed white as the rollers broke at its foot and dashed up the towering rock.”

Patrick O’Brian has been called “the greatest historical novelist of all time” by the Times of London and “Jane Austen on a ship of war” by NPR. Like Austen, his favorite author, Patrick O’Brian uses fiction to explore character.

In The Far Side of the World, you will sail on H. M. S. Surprise from Gibraltar to Brazil, around Cape Horn, up to the Galapagos Islands, and on to Polynesia in pursuit of U. S. S. Norfolk. There’s adventure aplenty, but what will stay in your memory long after finishing the novel is the courage, endurance, and camaraderie of the Surprise crew, all set down with O’Brian’s profound humanity and eye for the humor in life.

"...and they sailed over a dark blue disk, perpetually renewed, under a pale blue dome..."

“…and they sailed over a dark blue disk, perpetually renewed, under a pale blue dome, occasionally flecked with very high white cirrus.”

Dr. Eric Patterson, Dean of the School of Government, will lead our discussion, which will take place on Thursday, December 10 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For information about future book discussions at the Library, see the Library Book Club webpage.

 

 

Image credits:

Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest, “Cape Horn.” Accessed 19 Nov 2015.
http://quest.eb.com/search/126_482513/1/126_482513/cite

Vanderwell, Tom. “Big Blue Sky; Deep Blue Ocean,” Tom’s Photo’s Wayfarer’s Journal. Accessed 19 Nov 2015. https://tomvanderwell.wordpress.com/2014/02/25/big-blue-sky-deep-blue-ocean/

Book Discussion: Persuasion, by Jane Austen

PersuasionWhat if you refused the hand of the person you should have married?

Eight years ago Anne Elliot was disastrously persuaded by a confidante to break off her engagement with the man she loved, Frederick Wentworth, a young naval officer with whom she was united in temperament, sensibility, and interests. Eight years later, Wentworth returns a captain, still unmarried, and with a large fortune earned from victories against the French.

Anne, who has lived in regret ever since she broke off their engagement immediately finds her feelings for Frederick reignited. But will he even speak to her? Persuasion, Austen’s final and possibly most personal work, is a novel about second chances and love that can endure the test of time.

The Library Book Club will discuss Persuasion on Thursday, October 29 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For more information about this or other Book Club events, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Summer Reading at the Library

For the second straight summer, the Library Book Club has selected two beloved classics for adults and younger readers.

Sterling Hundley, “The Captain”

On June 25, Dr. Peter Fraser will lead a discussion of Treasure Island, one of the most popular and influential adventure stories of all time. Besides being the most ingenious of all pirate tales, the work is a coming-of-age novel, whose hero grows from an easily frightened and impulsive boy at the beginning to a brave and circumspect young man by the story’s end.

On July 30, we will discuss Little Women, one of the most revered American novels. Little Women, Louisa May Alcott’s most autobiographical work, tells the story of the formation and coming of age of four sisters in New England during the second half of the nineteenth century.

Rebecca Green, "Jo Writing"

Rebecca Green, “Jo Writing”

Our book discussions will take place from 12:00 to 1:00 in the Library Conference Room. We are especially eager to have younger readers participate! As always, distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For more information about these events or the Library Book Club, contact Harold Henkel at 757-352-4198 or harohen@regent.edu.

Image Credits:

Sterling Hundley (illustrator), “The Captain,” Treasure Island, The Folio Society website, http://www.foliosociety.com/book/TSL/treasure-island.

Rebecca Green (illustrator), “Jo Writing,” Little Women, The Folio Society website, http://www.foliosociety.com/book/LWM/little-women.

Short story discussion: Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami, one of Japan’s most acclaimed living writers, was born in 1949 in Kyoto, the son of a Buddhist priest. In 1978 Murakami was watching a baseball game between the Yakult Swallows and the Hiroshima Carp when Dave Hilton, an American, came to bat. The instant Hilton hit a double, Murakami suddenly realized his life’s vocation. He went home and began writing that night.

“The six stories in After the Quake are set at the time of the catastrophic 1995 Kobe earthquake, when Japan became brutally aware of the fragility of its daily existence. But the upheavals that afflict Murakami’s characters are even deeper and more mysterious, emanating from a place where the human meets the inhuman.”*

Haruki Murakami

The Library Book Club will meet on April 23 to discuss After the Quake. The Library has several copies available for check out, and an excerpt of the first one, “ufo in Kushiro” is available on the author’s website.

The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.
For more information about this or other literature events at the Library, see the Library Book Club webpage, or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

*Biographical and book information are taken from Haruki Murakami’s official website: http://www.harukimurakami.com/