Tag Archives: InterLibrary Loan

Feedback Express — Don’t purchase articles!

Editor’s note: The Library faculty is in the process of analyzing the results of the 2012 LibQUAL+® Library Survey. In the coming weeks, we will use this space to address some of the concerns raised by the survey takers.

In the LibQual survey, several students commented that when using the Library databases, they are sometimes asked to purchase articles:

  • “A lot of the electronic resources for Psychology and Counseling provide only abstracts or summaries of journal articles and cannot be accessed in full without extra payment.”
  • “I read the abstract through Google scholar and then pay a fee for the article if I need it.”

The Library recommends that students and faculty never purchase articles or dissertations from database vendors. The reason is that there is almost always a quick way of obtaining the article without paying for it.

Whenever you get a citation or abstract without the full-text, the first step should be to check the Full-Text Journal Finder to find out whether the journal in question is available in full-text from a different database. See the Library’s tutorial on using this tool.

If none of the Library’s databases has the article you need, you can request it though our InterLibrary Loan service. This automated, easy-to-use service is also very fast. Most journal articles are delivered to the requester in 2-3 days.

The librarians strive to use our resources budget to provide the most online content possible, with InterLibrary Loan providing expeditious access to what we don’t have. If you are ever in doubt about the quickest way to get full-text access to an article, contact us.

Library welcomes new InterLibrary Loan/Document Delivery Assistant

My name is Heather Brist. Many may know my name or have seen my face working at Regent Library’s front circulation desk for two and a half years; however, I now serve as InterLibrary Loan/Document Delivery Assistant. I genuinely have a love for books and am very thankful to be surrounded by them daily.

In May 2011, I graduated from Regent’s Undergrad English program with a creative writing cognate. Currently, my favorite form of writing is poetry. I own my own blog called breatheinred.com, where I write poetry about the “Bride of Christ” concept. Over the summer I entered an amateur poetry contest with World Poetry Movement and won the editor’s choice award for a poem called “Theologian’s Dream”.

I look forward to learning more about the Library and to building new relationships here at Regent University.

What do they do? — New monthly column

Editor’s note: Beginning this month, we reprise a column that ran from 2003 to 2004, in which we featured the different departments within the Library. This time around, we will feature each month a member of the Library faculty or staff, in order to give our readers a snapshot of the people behind our resources and services.

Yabbeju (Jabez) Rapaka
InterLibrary Loan/Document Delivery Assistant

I have been working full-time in the InterLibrary Loan Department for the past five and a half years. I assist Regent students and faculty as well as students and faculty members from universities around the world by sending books and articles. At Regent, I teach Religious Studies courses in the School of Undergraduate Studies and Old Testament I & II in the School of Divinity.

Originally from Eluru, Andhra Pradesh, India, I earned MBA and M.Div. degrees from Regent in 2004 and will complete a Ph.D. in Renewal Studies at the end of 2011. In my leisure, I like to cook Indian food, especially curry chicken.

In 2004, my wife, Gloria Rapaka, and I founded Love & Hope Ministries to meet the spiritual and physical needs of the poor, needy, destitute, neglected and the unwanted of society, including children, widows, the elderly, and pastors in India and Haiti. For seven years, God has been faithful in helping our ministry continue projects both in India and Haiti. For more information about Love & Hope Ministries, please see our website.

Patty Hughson receives Library’s S*T*A*R Award

On July 25th, Patty Hughson received the Library’s S*T*A*R Award for Outstanding service. The nominating criteria for this award come from the initials in the acronym:

S — Servant, “Second-miler”

T — Team Player

A — Adaptor

Patty Hughson receives S*T*A*R award from Library Dean, Sara Baron

R — Resourceful, Reliable

Patty has served as the Library’s Supervisor of InterLibrary Loan since 2000. Every year, She and InterlibraryLoan receive glowing comments on our Customer Satisfaction Survey. Two comments from the 2011 CSS are representative:

  • “I am so very thankful for the great job Patty does in the ILL Dept. She processes requests promptly and she is a joy to work with!”
  • “I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE Interlibrary Loan Services and the people who work in that area. I rely on ILL to get my research done. Patty rocks! :)”

On the nomination for the award, a fellow staff-member wrote, “Patty remembers little things about people and follows-up… [she] is always ready to help out with events and offer suggestions for improvement. She speaks kindly when in disagreement and is ready for a hearty “yea” when in agreement with decisions. Her support is evident through prayer and tangible signs of edification of her colleagues.”

Congratulations, Patty!

Feedback Express — Where’s the full text?

Written by Sandra Yaegle, Head of Public Services

In the course of providing research assistance, the librarians are occasionally asked why full-text databases, such as Academic Search Complete and ATLA Religion, also return records with no full-text attached. A comment on the 2010 Customer Satisfaction Survey posed this question directly:

If the university doesn’t subscribe to a particular publication, why do articles from that publication come up when I search for topics in the database when the full-text is not available?

It is correct that when you search the databases you will encounter material that is not immediately available in full-text. This can occur for a variety of reasons. There may be publisher restrictions, or the library’s subscription may only provide a portion of the full-text. If you are searching for an article and the database returns only a record with no full-text, your next step should be to check the Full-Text Journal Finder. This great timesaving tool is a list of every publication that the Library has access to in full-text. It allows users to search journals, magazines, and newspapers by title. If the Library has the publication in hard copy or electronic form, the Full-Text Journal Finder links directly to it in the relevant database or page in the Library catalog.

If the Full-text Journal Finder indicates that we have no full-text access to a journal or issue you need, the Library’s Interlibrary Loan service can acquire most articles for you in PDF in under a week.

The Full-Text Journal Finder is a powerful resource that provides Regent researchers with the quickest access to full-text articles in the Library databases. Providing you allow a week for receipt, Interlibrary Loan can usually supply you with articles not available from our databases.

If you have a question or concern about the Library that you would like to see addressed in this space, please use our online comment form or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.