Tag Archives: Library Book Club

Book Discussion: Reformation! Luther Steps Forward

Martin Luther nails the 95 Theses to the door of Wittenberg Cathedral, 31 Oct. 1517. Painting, 1872, by Ferdinand Pauwels.

Since the publication of How the Irish Saved Civilization in 1995, Thomas Cahill has been acclaimed as one of America’s most inviting and evocative scholars of history and culture. In Heretics and Heroes (2013), Cahill surveys the creativity and tumult, the spirituality and violence of the Renaissance and Reformation.

At our meeting on Thursday February 15, we will focus on Chapter 4: “Reformation! Luther Steps Forward.” Dr. Daniel Gilbert, professor of theology and church history, will lead our conversation. The chapter is only 21 pages long, so if you haven’t had time for one of our previous book discussions, this is a great opportunity. The meeting will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Tea and a snack will be served.

For a free copy of the reading, email Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. Contact Harold for a link to the live discussion.

Book Discussion: The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa, by John Azumah

legacy-arab-islam-in-africaJoin Professor Emeritus Dr. Joseph Kickasola and the Library Book Club on Friday, October 28 for a discussion of an important historical topic that until recently has received too little attention from scholars.

The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa is the first book to document Arab-Islam’s role in the slave trade of Africa. Many books have covered the role of Christians in the slave trade from Africa to the West, but John Azumah, a native of Ghana, is the first scholar to produce a full accounting of the Arab-Muslim role in the enslavement of African peoples. The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa is a must-read for anyone with an interest in the history of the slave trade, which continues to this day in parts of the Islamic world.

Our discussion will take place at 12:00pm in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Google Hangouts. The focus will be on chapter 4, “Muslim Slavery and Black Africa.” For a free PDF of this chapter, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

The Library also has four copies of the book available for check-out. The books are located on the Book Club shelf, just to the right of the main staircase.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Library Book Club Reading Schedule 2016-2017

Read literature, and argue the great questions of life with the likes of Leo Tolstoy.

One of the most famous openings in literature is the beginning of Anna Karenina: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Because Tolstoy is one the supreme writers of all time, readers have tended to accept his claim about families as a piece of incontrovertible wisdom. Reader and essayist David P. Goldman, however, argues that Tolstoy got it exactly backwards: “…unhappy families are all unhappy in the same way. It is happy families that are different, because every child is radically unique, such that raising children is the one human activity that is sure to surprise.”*

Goldman’s riposte to Tolstoy brings to mind three reasons on why it is essential that we read literature throughout our lives:

  1. To gain new perspectives, to see the world through other people’s eyes.
  2. To “converse” with the great authors through engagement with their works.
  3. To understand ourselves better.
    1. The mission of the Library Book Club is to encourage the reading of great literature by bringing members of the Regent and CBN communities together to enjoy the unique pleasure of reading and discussing books. For our tenth year, we have assembled a schedule of five classics from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, one acclaimed historical novel about the life of King David, a selection of modern Hebrew poems (our first foray into poetry), a history monograph, and a contemporary memoir. So we hope there’s something for everyone!

      Library Book Club Schedule 2016 – 2017

      Month

      Author

      Title

      Date & Time

      September

      Geraldine Brooks

      The Secret Chord

      Sept 27 at 12:00

      October

      John Allembillah Azumah

      The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa (Dr. Joseph N. Kickasola, discussion moderator)

      Oct 28 at 12:00

      December

      Edith Wharton

      Ethan Frome

      Dec 9 at 12:00

      January

      Shusaku Endo

      Silence

      Jan 31 at 12:00

      February

      Ta-Nehisi Coates

      Between the World and Me

      Feb 27 at 12:00

      March

      John Bunyan

      The Pilgrim’s Progress

      Mar 31 at 12:00

      April

      Yehuda Amichai

      The Poetry of Yehuda Amichai (Rabbi Dr. Israel Zoberman, discussion moderator)

      Apr 21 at 1:00

      June

      Charlotte Brontë

      Jane Eyre

      June 30 at 12:00

      July

      Elizabeth George Speare

      The Bronze Bow

      July 28 at 12:00

      Time & Location

      Book Club meetings usually take place at noon during the final week of each month in the Library Conference Room. The day of the week depends on the availability and preference of readers. To request a day, send an e-mail message to Harold Henkel (harohen@regent.edu). Check the events tab on the Library Facebook Group for confirmed dates and times. Tea and refreshments are served, and participants are welcome to bring a lunch.

      Distance students and faculty welcome

      Distance students and faculty are invited to join discussions via Google Hangouts, Google’s free videoconferencing service. Here is the permanent link for all Library Hangout events: https:plus.google.comhangouts_eventc0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

      For more information about the Book Club, see our website or contact Harold Henkel.

      _________________________________________

      *David P. Goldman, “Thanks, but I already have a novel,” Asia Times Online, January 29, 2013, http:www.atimes.comatimesFront_PageOA29Aa01.html.

      Book Discussion: Washington Square, by Henry James

      William Glackens, Washington Square 1910 William Glackens, Washington Square 1910

      Set in the New York of James’s early childhood, Washington Square is one of Henry James’s most appealing and popular novels, with the most straightforward plot and style of any of his works.

      Dr. Austin Sloper is a wealthy and domineering father who is disappointed in his daughter, whom he dismisses as plain and simpleminded. The gentle and dutiful Catherine Sloper has always been in awe of her father, but when she falls in love with Morris Townsend, a penniless charmer whom Dr. Sloper accuses of being a fortune hunter, she dares to defy him. A battle of wills then ensues that will leave her forever changed. Readers have long admired the way that the innocent Catherine, misled by her meddling aunt and mistreated by both her father and her suitor, grows in strength and wisdom over the course of the novel.

      John Singer Sargent, Two Girls Fishing, 1912 John Singer Sargent, Two Girls Fishing, 1912

      The Library Book Club will discuss Washington Square on Thursday, January 28 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

      For information about future book discussions at the Library, see the Library Book Club webpage or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

      Library Book Club Schedule 2015-2016

      Painting by Sister Isabella Guerra (see image credit below).

      In the final volume of In Search of Lost Time, Proust’s narrator experiences a number of epiphanies about the nature of creativity that have been percolating in his mind for hundreds of pages. One of these concerns the value of reading:

      Every reader, as he reads, is actually the reader of himself. The writer’s work is only a kind of optical instrument he provides the reader so he can discern what he might never have seen in himself without this book.

      And that is not all we get from literature. For Proust, it is literature (and the other arts) that teach us to see the world through new eyes:

      By art alone we are able to get outside ourselves, to know what another sees of this universe which for him is not ours, the landscapes of which would remain as unknown to us as those of the moon. Thanks to art, instead of seeing one world, our own, we see it multiplied…

      The mission of the Library Book Club is to encourage the reading of great literature by bringing members of the Regent and CBN communities together to enjoy the unique pleasure of reading and discussing books. For our ninth year, we have assembled a schedule of American, British, and Israeli works from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

      Library Book Club Schedule 2015 – 2016

      Month

      Author

      Title

      Date & Time*

      September

      Geraldine Brooks

      March

      September 24 at 12:00

      October

      Jane Austen

      Persuasion

      October 29 at 12:00

      Nov – Dec

      Patrick O’Brian

      The Far Side of the World

      December 10 at 12:00

      January

      Henry James

      Washington Square

      January 28 at 12:00

      February

      Toni Morrison

      Beloved

      February 25 at 12:00

      March – April

      Meir Shalev

      A Pigeon and a Boy

      April 14 at 12:00

      June

      Thomas Hardy

      Far from the Madding Crowd

      June 30 at 12:00

      Time & Location

      *Book Club meetings usually take place at noon on the final Thursday of each month in the Library Conference Room. Dates and times above are tentative. Check the events pages on our Facebook or Google+ sites for confirmed dates and times. Tea and refreshments are served, and participants are welcome to bring a lunch.

      Distance Students and Faculty Welcome

      Distance students and faculty may join our discussions via Google Hangouts, Google’s free videoconferencing service. Here is the permanent link for all Library Hangout events: https:plus.google.comhangouts_eventc0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

      For more information about the Book Club, see our webpage or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

      Image Credit: Painting by Sister Isabella Guerra, a nun at the Cistercian monastery of Santa Lucia, Zaragoza in Spain. For information about Sister Isabella and examples of her work, see Lines and Colors (blog) at http:linesandcolors.com20111113isabel-guerra.