IEEE Computer Society Digital Library

IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) is the world’s largest technical professional society. It is designed to serve professionals involved in all aspects of electrical, electronic, and computing fields.

The IEEE Computer Society Digital Library (CSDL) covers all areas of computing in new and emerging technologies as well as seminal papers and best practices. The CSDL provides online access to 33 journals and transactions and more than 9,000 conference publications.

Along with ACM Digital Library, the CSDL is a core resource for study and research in computer science, computer engineering, cyber security, and digital forensics.

To begin searching CSDL, click here.

Major New Archive of American Periodicals, 1684-1912

Regent students and faculty now have access to the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection. Founded in 1812, the AAS is the oldest historical society in the United States and one of the most important libraries documenting the life of the American people from the colonial era through the first years of the 20th century.

The Historical Periodicals Collection provides digital access to the most comprehensive collection of American periodicals published between 1684 and 1912. For this project, the AAS partnered with EBSCO to place more than 6,500 original documents onto the EBSCOhost platform to provide maximum functionality for researchers. Subjects covered in the collection reach into every facet of American life, including science, literature, medicine, agriculture, women’s fashion, family life, and religion.

This archive is an indispensable source for any research into the history and culture of the United States. To begin using the Historical Periodicals Collection, click here.

Web Browsers: Chrome or Firefox?

One of the most common causes of accessibility problems with Library online resources is web browser incompatibility. The librarians and staff regularly receive calls from students unable to view or download full-text articles or view online video. Often a simple change of web browser solves the problem.

Readers interested in full reviews of the current crop of web browsers can read this July 18, 2018 article from Digital Trends, but here are three basic tips based on recent experience at the Library:

  1. Both Microsoft’s old Internet Explorer and new Edge browsers are problematic and are not recommended for searching and retrieving Library resources.
  2. All Library users should have both Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome installed on their computers. Unfortunately, at this time, it is not possible to recommend one browser for all research needs. Some article, ebook, and video databases work better with Firefox and some better with Chrome.
  3. In November 2017, Mozilla released its “Quantum” version of Firefox. The old version seems increasingly susceptible to problems, so if you haven’t already, be sure to install Quantum; like all Mozilla programs, it’s completely free.

A note to Safari users: Apple’s Safari browser appears to work well with Library databases, but we still recommend keeping both Firefox and Chrome on your computers.

Library Finds Document Signed by Andrew Jackson in Old Book

by Donald Gantz, Director of Special Collections and Archives

Editor’s note: Followers of news about libraries know that, from time to time, historical treasures are discovered in the world’s great libraries, such as a medicinal recipe by Hippocrates uncovered last year at St. Catherine’s Monastery, Sinai. One of the treasures in Regent Library’s Special Collections has just such a story. The following article by Library Archivist Don Gantz was originally published in the February 2006 issue of Library Link. The article, written shortly after the manuscript’s discovery, is cautious about its authenticity. The letter has since been authenticated by Lee Shepard, retired Director of Manuscripts and Archives at the Virginia Historical Society.

Kathy Watson shows the letter fastened into the book she was cataloging.

Thanks to the alertness of Kathy Watson, cataloging assistant in the University Library, we have found what appears to be an 1813 arrest order signed by Major General Andrew Jackson. Jackson is famous for defeating the Creek Indians and the British at New Orleans during the War of 1812 and later for becoming the seventh president of the United States.

Kathy was cataloging books acquired from the William Tyndale College library when she found this document fastened between the blank fly leaves of Augustus Buell’s 1904 History of Andrew Jackson. This brief hand-written document orders the arrest of a Sergeant Baldrige and his detention by a special guard in the fort.

The document seems to have evidence of an official seal which secured it after it was folded several times. It had “Gen’l Order, Dec 9, 1813” written on the outside after the folds, and the outside was soiled from handling. It’s placement in the book likely served to preserve it.

Our conclusions about the authenticity of the document remain to be confirmed by having it examined by an expert on historical documents. Our best transcription so far of the hard-to-read hand-scrawled document is:

The adjutant general will immediately arrest Sergeant Baldrige of Capt. Thomas Williamson’s, Company 2 Regt. V- and place him under the provost guard within the Fort,- and warn Lt. Masons who commands the provost guard of this day to attend with his guard within the Fort.

Andrew Jackson
Major Genl
Headquarters, Fort
Strother Decbr 9th 1813

1813 Arrest Order signed by Major General Andrew Jackson

The date of the document, December 9, 1813, and the location, Fort Strother, Alabama suggest it is not a routine document reflecting a routine discipline problem. At this time Jackson was commander of the Tennessee militia and the Tennessee volunteers. Both groups had already attempted defection but had been dissuaded by Jackson’s heavy-handed intervention.

The volunteers, however, were determined to leave on the next day, December 10, 1813, when their one-year enlistment expired. Jackson was equally determined that they would stay until March 10 because they had been given three months at home during that period and he was demanding twelve months of actual service. There were military lawyers in the camp telling the volunteers they had the right to leave. Given Jackson’s iron will, a confrontation was inevitable.

On December 9 (the date of the arrest order), the volunteers’ intentions to leave became clear. But before they made their move, Jackson made his. He ordered the loyal militia to line up above the road to Tennessee and do whatever was necessary to prevent the volunteers’ departure. He ordered the mutinous volunteers to be brought out to parade on the west side of the fort. Jackson then ordered the loyal artillery gunners to aim their two fieldpieces on the volunteers. He mounted his horse, rode up and down the ranks, and exhorted them not to desert. Finally, to force a decisive response, Jackson told the artillery gunners to light their matches, one small step from firing. Jackson was also in the line of fire. He said, and demonstrated, if they chose to desert, it would be over his dead body.The volunteers decided they would stay until the expected reinforcements arrived. Jackson accepted their decision and the mass mutiny was prevented.

December 9, 1813 was an unforgettable day in the military career of Andrew Jackson. It was also the beginning of a series of serious setbacks. Three days later, December 12th, 1,500 reinforcements arrived and Jackson was obliged to keep his word and let the Tennessee volunteers return home. When they had just departed he learned that all the reinforcements’ terms of service would expire within a few weeks. He was eventually left with too few men to defend the fort, which was situated deep in enemy territory, let alone finish his campaign against the formidable Creek Indians.

This period of Jackson’s military career reads like a suspense thriller, and its events leave us itching to learn more about Sergeant Baldrige and why he was arrested on that fateful day, December 9, 1813.

Additional Reading

Buell, Augustus C. History of Andrew Jackson, Pioneer, Patriot, Soldier, Politician, President. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1904.

James, Marquis. Andrew Jackson, the Border Captain. Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1933.

Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.

Watch the World Cup at the Library

Watch the entire game or just a few minutes at the Library.

The quadrennial FIFA World Cup is a global event like no other. Over a billion people around the world watched the 2014 final match in Rio de Janeiro, but perhaps even this pales when compared to the artificial earthquake set off last Sunday by jubilant fans in Mexico City following their team’s stunning 1-0 upset over defending champion Germany.

The 2018 FIFA World Cup kicked off last Thursday and will continue through the July 15 final in Moscow. Sadly, the United State did not qualify this year, but you have a choice of 32 other teams to cheer for.

The official 2018 World Cup ball has a pixelated pattern in homage to the classic Telstar design of 1970.

The Library invites soccer fans (as well as the merely curious) to watch the World Cup at the Library. We will be showing all matches televised on Fox when the Library is open for the duration of the tournament. Remember, the Library is closed on Sundays during the summer, so you’ll have to find another location for those matches, which includes the final!