Global Issues Database: Opposing Viewpoints in Context

opposingViewpointsOpposing Viewpoints in Context is the premier comparative database for critical national and global issues. This cross-curricular research tool supports all disciplines at Regent, including the sciences, social sciences, religion, and humanities. The database provides researchers with assurance that that they have considered their topic and thesis from multiple points of view.

Some of the content in Opposing Viewpoints in Context includes:

  • More than 20,100 pro/con viewpoints.
  • More than 19,200 reference articles, including topic overviews.
  • Interactive maps show statistical trends in a readily understandable way.

Opposing Viewpoints also provides citation tools for all documentation styles used at Regent and provides seamless integration with Google Drive, allowing users to save articles directly to their accounts. Click here to begin using the database.

As always, the Library welcomes comments and suggestions about our electronic resources. Please use our evaluation form to let us know what you think of Opposing Viewpoints.

ProQuest Central: 39 Databases in One

ProquestCentralThis summer, the Library added ProQuest Central to its database collection, significantly enhancing the breadth of research available to Regent users.

ProQuest Central is the one of the largest multidisciplinary scholarly databases in the world. The resource provides access to 39 of ProQuest’s complete databases covering more than 175 subjects. Researchers will find millions of full-text, peer-reviewed articles in all disciplines taught at Regent. ProQuest Central features a familiar, user-friendly platform optimized to provide deep subject access.

A complete list of all 39 databases in Central as well as tutorials for searching them are located on the ProQuest Central Libguide. Regent users can access Central databases individually on the Library database homepage or search them all at once by clicking here.

As always, the Library welcomes comments and suggestions about our electronic resources. Please use our evaluation form to send feedback about Central.

New Discovery Tool: Summon

SummonLogo1The Library has a subscription to a premium discovery tool from ProQuest.

Summon® gives you the power to search nearly all of the Library’s print and online resources at once, including items such as:

  • Print and electronic books
  • Scholarly journals
  • Magazines and newspapers
  • Dissertations and theses
  • Streaming videos
  • Open access collections

Summon’s filters and limiters allow you to search millions of items on your topic and zero in on the most relevant books, articles, and videos in the Library’s collections.

Summon is a great place to begin any research project because it searches easy-to-overlook databases and e-book collections. Ready to get started? This video from ProQuest will explain the basics of searching for content, refining the results, and saving citations:

After watching this short tutorial, you will be ready to take Summon for a test drive. Click here to get started.

After trying a few basic searches in Summon, you may want to watch this “beyond the basics” tutorial:

As always, the Library welcomes comments and suggestions about our electronic resources. Please use our evaluation form to send feedback about Summon or any of our databases.

Library Book Club Reading Schedule 2016-2017

Read literature, and argue the great questions of life with the likes of Leo Tolstoy.

One of the most famous openings in literature is the beginning of Anna Karenina: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Because Tolstoy is one the supreme writers of all time, readers have tended to accept his claim about families as a piece of incontrovertible wisdom. Reader and essayist David P. Goldman, however, argues that Tolstoy got it exactly backwards: “…unhappy families are all unhappy in the same way. It is happy families that are different, because every child is radically unique, such that raising children is the one human activity that is sure to surprise.”*

Goldman’s riposte to Tolstoy brings to mind three reasons on why it is essential that we read literature throughout our lives:

  1. To gain new perspectives, to see the world through other people’s eyes.
  2. To “converse” with the great authors through engagement with their works.
  3. To understand ourselves better.

The mission of the Library Book Club is to encourage the reading of great literature by bringing members of the Regent and CBN communities together to enjoy the unique pleasure of reading and discussing books. For our tenth year, we have assembled a schedule of five classics from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, one acclaimed historical novel about the life of King David, a selection of modern Hebrew poems (our first foray into poetry), a history monograph, and a contemporary memoir. So we hope there’s something for everyone!

Library Book Club Schedule 2016 – 2017

Month Author Title Date & Time
September Geraldine Brooks The Secret Chord t.b.a.
October John Allembillah Azumah The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa (Dr. Joseph N. Kickasola, discussion moderator) t.b.a.
December Edith Wharton Ethan Frome t.b.a.
January Primo Levi The Periodic Table t.b.a.
February Ta-Nehisi Coates Between the World and Me t.b.a.
March John Bunyan The Pilgrim’s Progress t.b.a.
April Yehuda Amichai The Poetry of Yehuda Amichai (Rabbi Dr. Israel Zoberman, discussion moderator) t.b.a.
June Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre t.b.a.
July Thomas Hughes Tom Brown’s School Days t.b.a.

Time & Location

Book Club meetings usually take place at noon during the final week of each month in the Library Conference Room. The day of the week depends on the availability and preference of readers. To request a day, send an e-mail message to Harold Henkel (harohen@regent.edu). Check the events tab on the Library Facebook Group for confirmed dates and times. Tea and refreshments are served, and participants are welcome to bring a lunch.

Distance students and faculty welcome

Distance students and faculty are invited to join discussions via Google Hangouts, Google’s free videoconferencing service. Here is the permanent link for all Library Hangout events: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

For more information about the Book Club, see our website or contact Harold Henkel.

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*David P. Goldman, “Thanks, but I already have a novel,” Asia Times Online, January 29, 2013, http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Front_Page/OA29Aa01.html.

Oxford Scholarship Online

Oxford University Press building (1830) on Walton Street in Oxford

Oxford University Press building (1830) on Walton Street in Oxford

The Library has just purchased more than 1,700 scholarly monographs through the online division of Oxford University Press.

Oxford Scholarship Online (OSO) includes monographs in twenty academic disciplines and is an essential resource for humanities, sciences, social science, medicine, and law. Each book includes abstracts and keywords at book and chapter level to allow users to see at a glance whether the content is relevant for their research.

The OSO platform includes a number of user-friendly features, including advanced searching, citation generation, and social media options. Researchers can also create a free account in order to save favorite searches, books, and chapters for quick access in future sessions.

Click here to begin exploring this important resource.