Book Discussion: Ethan Frome, by Edith Wharton

efAt only 100 pages (Penguin edition), Ethan Frome may be the shortest masterpiece in American literature.

Edith Wharton’s tale of forbidden emotions is set on a New England farm in the first decade of the twentieth century. Ethan Frome works and struggles to maintain a bearable existence with his suspicious and hypochondriac wife, Zeenie. But when Zeenie’s vivacious cousin enters their household as a “hired girl,” Ethan finds himself obsessed with her and the dream of happiness she comes to represent. In one of American fiction’s most intense narratives, Wharton moves the ill-starred characters toward their tragic destinies.

On Friday, December 9, professor of literature and film Pete Fraser will moderate a discussion of Ethan Frome. The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. We will also view a clip from the 1993 film adaptation starring Liam Neeson, Patricia Arquette, and Joan Allen. The Library has multiple print and electronic copies of the book.

Distance students and faculty are invited to us via Google Hangouts.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

A selection of the recent faculty monographs. See our Facebook and Google+ pages for more photos from this event.

On November 15, the Library inaugurated what it hopes will become a long-standing tradition on campus: a special event to honor faculty authors and formally induct their scholarship into the Library collection.

As this was our first time holding such an event, we included works published from January 2014 through May 2016. The numbers are impressive: 33 books or book chapters by 36 authors, as well as scholarly articles by 49 authors. A total of 82 members of the faculty were honored.

In addition to recognizing all the recent faculty authors, our event featured book talks by two of them: Dr. Joseph Bucci from the College of Arts & Sciences gave an overview of his book Redemptive Leadership: Offering Second Chances as a Value-Added Management Practice, and Dr. Diane Chandler, from the School of Divinity presented some of the main themes in her monograph, Christian Spiritual Formation: An Integrated Approach for Personal and Relational Wholeness.

At the end of the book talks, all monograph authors were invited to inscribe the Library’s copies of their works, and article authors received a special bookmark with the title and publication of their work. In April 2017, we will hold our second Spotlight on Faculty Scholarship to honor faculty publication beginning with June 2016.

Photos from this event may be viewed on our Facebook and Google+ pages.

Hone your strategic thinking at the Library

The Library's Go set features a heavy bamboo board and natural stone playing pieces.

The Library’s Go set features a heavy bamboo board and natural stone playing pieces.

When two tigers fight, what is left is
one dead tiger and one wounded one.
-Chinese Proverb

Go is a board game that originated in China more than 5,000 years ago. Like chess, Go has always been regarded as a tool for developing strategic thinking, but the mentalities required for success in the two games could hardly be more different.

Chess is a metaphor of decisive battle. Each player strives to capture the opponent’s king by annihilating his capacity to resist. This means that the strategic sense developed by chess is one where the object is total victory.

In contrast to chess’ emphasis on calculation, Go emphasizes judgement. Therefore, Go seems to resemble business or international relations more than warfare. The object is not to destroy, but to build territory. In Go, patience is essential, and greed is punished.

Go writer Peter Shotwell writes that “Japanese executives learned to look at the national and international corporate worlds as Go boards and designed many of their strategies accordingly…One should try to win, but that had to involve allowing the opponent to win something too, because all-out fights might destroy both competitors.”*

The Library has a new professional quality Go set, in front of the reference desk. We hope this set will inspire some of our students to learn about this rich and beautiful game. Intrigued? Check out this short tutorial on the rules:


If you are interested in learning to play Go, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu for suggestions on getting started.

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*Peter Shotwell, Go! More Than a Game, (Ruland, VT: Tuttle Publishing, 2003), xi. http://library.regent.edu/record=b1545173~S0

 

Mathematics Database: MathSciNet

Seal of the American Mathematical Society. The Greek motto, "Let no one ignorant in geometry enter," was reportedly engraved on the door of Plato's Academy.

Seal of the American Mathematical Society. The Greek motto, “Let no one ignorant in geometry enter,” was reportedly engraved on the door of Plato’s Academy.

The Library now has a subscription to MathSciNet, the electronic publication of the American Mathematical Society. MathSciNet is the most comprehensive mathematics database available and offers access to a carefully maintained and easily searchable database of reviews, abstracts, and bibliographic information for mathematical literature.

MathSciNet contains millions of items and direct links to original articles from over 1,800 journals. Over 100,000 new items are added to the database each year. Bibliographic data for digital archives date back to the early 1800s.

Click here to begin using MathSciNet. A short tutorial on YouTube is available by clicking here.

The Library strives to provide the highest quality databases possible in each discipline. Student and faculty comments are an important part of how we accomplish this. Please consider sharing your opinion of MathSciNet by filling out this short evaluation form.

Graphs of functions showing an average rate of change. (Source: Image Quest database)

Graphs of functions showing an average rate of change. (Source: Image Quest database)

Premium Business Database Trials

The Library currently has trial subscriptions to three premium U.S. and international business databases:

empEuromonitor International Passport
Global market research database providing insight on industries, economies, and consumers worldwide. Clients gain an unbiased view of industry sectors, countries, and companies. Euromonitor reports are written by local analysts from around the world and capitalize on their knowledge of the local market, language fluency, and access to the best research sources. Trial ends on Nov. 17, 2016. Click here for a quick YouTube tutorial on Euromonitor International
Passport.

ibisIBISWorld Global Industry Research Reports
IBISWorld U.S. Industry Reports are one the Library’s most popular business databases. The global economy presents its own set of opportunities and threats for businesses in a range of industries. IBISWorld’s 75 global industry reports offer the same clear and up-to-date forecasts and analysis as their U.S. reports, but focus on industry performance in key regions like Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and more. Trial ends on Nov. 30, 2016. Click here for a quick YouTube tutorial on IBISWorld Industry Reports.

IBISWorld Procurement Reports
IBIS World Procurement Reports concentrate on specific products rather than an industry view. Reports include executive summary, pricing environment product characteristics, supply chain & vendors, purchasing process, negotiation questions, and buyer power score. Trial ends on Nov. 10, 2016.

The Library strives to provide the highest quality databases possible in each discipline. Student and faculty comments are an important part of how we accomplish this. If you feel any of the above resources would or would not be useful to your research, please let us know by filling out this short evaluation form.