Online Spotlight: Succeed with Summon

This month we begin a new monthly column in which we will highlight some of Library’s most important (and occasionally enjoyable) online resources that all students should know about. The goal is to provide very brief introductions to sites on the Library website that will help you research faster and more effectively.

And our first online resource is…

Summon

Summon is a kind of search engine purpose-built for academic libraries. Summon allows you to search almost all of the Library’s holdings and locate items such as full-text journal and periodical articles, books and ebooks, dissertations, AV and streaming video, and more.

Summon is able to search millions of records and locate highly relevant resources for the researcher thanks to the intuitive filters on the search screen. Unlike a web search engine like Google, where the trying different keyword combinations is the only way to locate what you are after, with Summon the filters allow you to start from the initial (usually enormous) search results and telescope into the articles, books, and videos you are really looking for.

Summon is a great place to begin any research project because it searches easy-to-overlook databases and e-book collections. Ready to get started? Click here to try a few searches, or view the short video tutorials first on our Summon Quick Guide.

While Summon is not an answer to every research problem, it is a powerful tool that can generally find the right resources for completing your projects. For questions about Summon, contact us by phone, email, text or chat.

Explore Creativity with First Fridays

This semester, on the first Friday of each month, the Library will host an informal series that will celebrate creativity and innovation. This will be an exciting way for students and faculty to meet innovators who are making a positive impact in our world.

The series will kick off this Friday with The Shoe That Grows™ founder and Regent alumnus Kenton Lee. Doris Gomez, Dean of the School of Business and Leadership, will introduce Kenton as he joins us online to tell how a walk with some kids in Kenya led to a simple but ingenious idea. The Shoe That Grows™ is a Patent for Humanity Award Winner this year.

The event will be held at the Library globe on the first floor on September 7 at 12:30.

IEEE Computer Society Digital Library

IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) is the world’s largest technical professional society. It is designed to serve professionals involved in all aspects of electrical, electronic, and computing fields.

The IEEE Computer Society Digital Library (CSDL) covers all areas of computing in new and emerging technologies as well as seminal papers and best practices. The CSDL provides online access to 33 journals and transactions and more than 9,000 conference publications.

Along with ACM Digital Library, the CSDL is a core resource for study and research in computer science, computer engineering, cyber security, and digital forensics.

To begin searching CSDL, click here.

Major New Archive of American Periodicals, 1684-1912

Regent students and faculty now have access to the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection. Founded in 1812, the AAS is the oldest historical society in the United States and one of the most important libraries documenting the life of the American people from the colonial era through the first years of the 20th century.

The Historical Periodicals Collection provides digital access to the most comprehensive collection of American periodicals published between 1684 and 1912. For this project, the AAS partnered with EBSCO to place more than 6,500 original documents onto the EBSCOhost platform to provide maximum functionality for researchers. Subjects covered in the collection reach into every facet of American life, including science, literature, medicine, agriculture, women’s fashion, family life, and religion.

This archive is an indispensable source for any research into the history and culture of the United States. To begin using the Historical Periodicals Collection, click here.

Web Browsers: Chrome or Firefox?

One of the most common causes of accessibility problems with Library online resources is web browser incompatibility. The librarians and staff regularly receive calls from students unable to view or download full-text articles or view online video. Often a simple change of web browser solves the problem.

Readers interested in full reviews of the current crop of web browsers can read this July 18, 2018 article from Digital Trends, but here are three basic tips based on recent experience at the Library:

  1. Both Microsoft’s old Internet Explorer and new Edge browsers are problematic and are not recommended for searching and retrieving Library resources.
  2. All Library users should have both Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome installed on their computers. Unfortunately, at this time, it is not possible to recommend one browser for all research needs. Some article, ebook, and video databases work better with Firefox and some better with Chrome.
  3. In November 2017, Mozilla released its “Quantum” version of Firefox. The old version seems increasingly susceptible to problems, so if you haven’t already, be sure to install Quantum; like all Mozilla programs, it’s completely free.

A note to Safari users: Apple’s Safari browser appears to work well with Library databases, but we still recommend keeping both Firefox and Chrome on your computers.