Don’t purchase database articles!

In preparation for this year’s survey of our users’ satisfaction with the Library, we have been taking a final look at the 2018 Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS).

One thing we noticed that particularly gave us pause is the frustration that sometimes occurs when an article is not available from our databases in full-text. Here are two representative comments:

  • “Some resources are not available so I have to go and purchase materials.”
  • “Many times I will search for an article and many of the links that come up require a purchase to view it.”

The Library recommends that students and faculty never purchase articles or dissertations from database vendors. The reason is that there is almost always a quick way of obtaining the item without paying for it.

Whenever you get a citation or abstract without the full-text, the first step should be to check the Full-Text Journal Finder to find out whether the journal in question is available in full-text from a different database.

If none of the Library’s databases has the article you need, you can request it though our InterLibrary Loan service. This automated, easy-to-use service is very fast. Most journal articles are delivered to the requester in 2-3 days.

The librarians strive to use our resources budget to provide the most online content possible, with InterLibrary Loan providing expeditious access to what we don’t have. If you are ever in doubt about the quickest way to get full-text access to an article, contact the reference librarians.

Library Reading Room open for quiet study

For centuries one of the chief sources of inspiration for library architects has been the main reading room, such as the Duke Humfrey’s Library at Oxford, which was used as the setting for Hogwarts Library in the Harry Potter films:

While we may not quite yet be able to be able to compete with the atmosphere of an Oxford library originally completed in 1480, Regent does have a beautiful reading room sure to enhance your concentration and sense of scholarly purpose:

The Regent’s Special Collections Reading Room is now open for quiet study 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm Sunday through Thursday. Electronic devices may be used for long as they are set on silent. On your visit, be sure to take a look at some of the rare objects in the Reading Room display cases, such as the ancient Greek amphora, the oldest item in the Library:

Eudora Welty discussion with Dr. Michael Crews

“Woman of the Thirties” (1935). Photograph by Eudora Welty.

One of Eudora Welty’s most loved short stories, “A Worn Path” is the tale of an elderly black woman’s long walk to town at Christmastime to purchase medicine for her sick grandson. According Welty, the creative stimulus for the story came from the “indelible” image of an old black woman she once saw crossing a wintry field. The theme of the story, the author explained, is “the deep-grained habit of love.”

On Friday, December 7 at 12:00, Dr. Michael Crews will lead a discussion of this remarkable short story in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Collaborate Ultra videoconference.

First published in in 1941 in the Atlantic Monthly magazine, “A Worn Path” is available free on the Atlantic website. The story is only 3,276 words and can be read in about 15 minutes.

But wait! Say your research has required so much reading lately, that you can’t manage even that. You have two other options:

  • A recording of Welty reading her story on YouTube.
  • An excellent film adaptations (with most of the dialog taken right from the story) available from FMG Films on Demand (Regent login credentials required).

So you have no excuse to miss this opportunity in literature appreciation!

For more information about this or other Book Club events, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Image credit: Image Credit: “Woman of the Thirties” (1935). Photograph by Eudora Welty. In a 1989 interview the author commented on her photograph: “She has a very sensitive face, as you can see. She was well aware of her predicament in poverty, and had good reasons for hopelessness. Well, she wasn’t hopeless. That was the point. She was courageous. She thought it was a hopeless situation, but she was tackling it.” https://theunintendedcurator.com/2017/09/14/eudora-welty-photographer/?fbclid=IwAR0Fvb0ZD34r6oNHwMoeIsROXG6wNyfO936517syVlws0FxX6VdpvJT51IM

Book Discussion: The Warden, by Anthony Trollope

On Friday, November 16, the Library Book Club will kickoff it’s 12th reading season with The Warden, Anthony Trollope’s tale of a kindly cathedral minister of music who suddenly finds himself the object of scandal when a fiery secular reformer decides that he is improperly benefiting from a Church endowment.

At only 98 pages The Warden is Trollope’s shortest novel and the best introduction to this great writer’s work. First published in 1855, many of the issues raised in the novel about Church governance are still relevant today.

The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Refreshments will be served.

Dr. Pete Fraser will lead our discussion. The Library collection has copies The Warden in print and ebook formats.

Distance students and faculty are invited to join the discussion via Collaborate Ultra: https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/18d438ef58c34c069e046cc809bb3ee9

For more information about this or other Book Club events, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.