COM School awards and scholarship on display at the Library

by Ellen Cox, Business Manager & Special Projects Assistant

The Library is currently exhibiting creative works, scholarship, and awards from the School of Communication and the Arts. The exhibit, located in the display cases in the front of the Library (near the large globe), is part of our Faculty Recognition Series. On display is just a sampling of the extraordinary creative output by the School’s faculty and students as well as the awards they have received in recent years. Also featured in the display is Justin Garcia (College of Arts and Sciences, 2014), winner of the 2013 Pixie Award for “Shoot.”

Congratulations to the faculty and students of the School of Communication and the Arts.

Please stop by the Library and see the exhibit. Photos of the items on display can be viewed on the Library’s Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Trial databases from Sage

Sage Publications is one the most respected independent publishers of scholarly books, journals, and reference products. This month, the Library has trial subscriptions to three Sage databases:

Sage Premier
More than 730 peer-reviewed journals comprising over 674,135 full-text articles. Subjects span the humanities, social sciences, and STEM disciplines. Trial ends June 6, 2015.

SAGE Research Methods plus Cases & Datasets
Information and assistance on writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing a research method, collecting and analyzing data, and writing up the findings. Spans the range of research methods used in the social and behavioral sciences, STEM disciplines, and the humanities. Trial ends May 29, 2015.

SAGE Video Collection
Streaming video collections in the social sciences supporting a broad range of research needs from undergraduate through doctoral levels. Trial ends June 6, 2015.

As always, the Library welcomes comments and suggestions about our electronic resources. Please use our evaluation form to send feedback about these trial databases.

Alumni benefits at the Library

The Library faculty and staff offer our sincere congratulations to all new graduates of Regent University. We are honored to have played a role in your accomplishment and would like to take this opportunity to remind you that Regent alumni have lifetime borrowing privileges at the Library. In addition, we are able to offer alumni access to fourteen online databases. So no matter where the future takes you, keep us in mind for your information needs.

To check out materials or use databases, please submit the online Alumni Registration Form. Processing may take up to five business days for verification and approval. For more information, please see the Services for Alumni page.

Accessing Biblical Commentaries as a Distance Student

by Melody Detar, Divinity Librarian

Venerable Bede (672-735). English monk, historian, and Biblical commentator.

Venerable Bede (672-735). English monk, historian, and Biblical commentator.

Biblical commentaries are an expensive, yet essential part of theological research. Since theological publishers have been slow to release commentaries and other theological resources digitally, students must often still rely on print materials for their research (although it never hurts to check for ebook versions as well!). Here are our tips for accessing commentaries as a distance student:

  1. The first thing to remember is to start your research early! Although you may take time in actually writing your paper, we recommend that you aim to gather the necessary resources as early as possible. This is so that you provide adequate time to ensure the resources you need are available and that there is time to acquire what you need.
  2. Select what resources meet your needs. If you are overwhelmed by the vast number of commentaries that are available, you are not alone! That is why the Regent University Library provides a research guide specifically aimed at helping you locate commentaries. This guide also houses a list of recommended commentaries developed by School of Divinity faculty.
  3. Request your selected resources through InterLibrary Loan (ILL). ILL can either ship circulating books to your home or provide resources electronically. When requesting commentaries, the book chapter option is recommended because the ILL department will scan up to 100 pages of a book and make it available as a PDF. This is faster than shipping books and is absolutely free of charge! Keep in mind that you do not need specific page numbers when entering a request; you can simply reference a passage, such as “Mark 9:14-29.”
  4. Consider local libraries. If you live near a theological library, you may prefer to browse their materials and check out books, if that option is available. The Regent University Library is now part of a reciprocal borrowing group composed of a growing list of theological libraries nationwide. Check if a theological library near you is part of the group and you will have free access to their materials and permission to check out books. If you do not find a library near you on the list, you may consider using ILL at a local public library or you may purchase a card to check out books at a local theological library. The Regent Library will reimburse our distance students up to $100 per year for an academic library card. Click here for more information and a reimbursement form.
  5. As always, contact a librarian if you have trouble finding what you need. We are excited to help you succeed!

Library or Writing Center: Where should I go?

by Jason Stuart, Reference Librarian

The Library and Writing Center are separate departments that together can help you flourish in your coursework. Knowing which one to use will save you from delays and headaches when tackling your assignments.

Each year on the Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), we receive several comments that suggest that students are not always aware of the different services the Library and Writing Center offer. Here are two comments from the CSS last fall:

  • “It would be convenient if someone could sit down and teach students how to do the different citation formats (Turabian, APA, MLA) because when I came to Regent I only knew how to cite in MLA.”
  • “…when I submit the MLA citations that Library [databases] say are correct, my professors tell me that they are not.”

Although the reference librarians can find citation information in the appropriate style manual, for expert citation assistance, the Writing Center is the place to go. The writing coaches there not only make sure your reference list and parenthetical citations (or footnotes for Turabian users) are formatted correctly, but help ensure that your paper does not contain inadvertent plagiarism through insufficient crediting of sources and ideas.

Use the Library and Writing Center for success in each stage of the research process.

 

 

 

 

 

In general, the Library is where you should go during the early and middle stages of your paper, before you get down to writing. The reference librarians will help you with questions about how and where to research a particular topic. They can also suggest resources to help you select or narrow down a topic, such as Issues & Controversies database.

Once you have your resources and are ready to begin writing, you are ready for the Writing Center. The Writing Center provides “beginning to end” coaching to make sure that your final draft will be as strong as possible.

For more information, view the Library and Writing Center videos.