Research Liaisons: At Your Service

by Sara Baron, Ed.D., Dean of the University Library

Many people start their library research with the indefatigable Google. However, in the library world we agree with author Neil Gaiman that, “Google can bring you back 100,000 answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.”

On the 2015 Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), we received several comments from students who are not sure where to turn with discipline-specific research problems. Here are two sample remarks:

  • “[The reference service] was somewhat helpful, but I think I kept asking librarians for source advice in subjects they weren’t as familiar with.”
  • “[Just] like students have an academic adviser, give each student an academic librarian that they can go to for help on particularly difficult projects, so they have a friend at the library.”

Yes, you have a friend at the Library. For each discipline at Regent, there is a Library Liaison who specializes in research in that subject and can help you find the best possible information for your projects. See the table below to find the research specialist in your discipline. Feel free to contact them directly or request help through our Ask a Librarian page. Whether student or faculty, your Library liaisons are standing by to help you succeed at Regent.

Students:

Research has shown that students with a GPA of 3.5 and higher frequently state that working with a librarian has helped them succeed.1 Library liaisons will:

  • Save you time by directing you to the best resources.
  • Meet with you online (Skype or Google Hangouts), over the phone, or in person.
  • Help you develop information finding and evaluating skills that will serve you well in your academic and professional careers.

Faculty:

Are you aware of the services your Library liaisons provide? These include:

  • Acquiring resources for your research and classes.
  • Developing research guides for your courses, or even a particular assignment, such as a big research project.
  • Teaching your students research skills in your classroom, in the Library, or online.
  • Helping you embed Library tools into your Blackboard courses.

A study published in Libraries and the Academy found that university faculty consider four functions of their libraries’ liaison program to be especially important:2

  1. Communicating with teaching faculty.
  2. Providing library services.
  3. Responding to faculty requests.
  4. Providing research expertise in the discipline.

The Library liaisons at Regent provide all these services and more!

Regent University Library Liaison Responsibilities for Instruction, Developing Research Guides, and Collection Development – 2014-2015:

Disciplines (Undergraduate & Graduate)

Library Faculty

Business & Leadership

Business Administration, Organizational Leadership, Strategic Leadership, Business, Leadership Studies, Economics

Harold Henkel

Communication

Communication, Cinema-TV, Journalism, Theatre, Animation

Instruction & Research Guides
Harold Henkel

 Collection Development
Sara Baron

Divinity

Practical Theology, Theological Studies, Divinity, Ministry, Renewal Studies, Biblical and Theological Studies, Christian Ministry, Theology, Youth Ministry

Melody Detar

Education

All programs, including: Curriculum & Instruction (including Curriculum Collection), School Administration, Higher Education, English Secondary Education, Interdisciplinary Studies (PreK-6 teacher licensure), Math Secondary Education

Sandy Yaegle

English

Harold Henkel

Foreign Languages/Studies

Hispanic Studies, French & Spanish

Instruction
Harold Henkel

Research Guides &
Collection Development
Georgi Bordner

Government

Government, Public Administration, International Studies, American Government & Politics, Homeland & International Security, International Relations & Foreign Policy, Political Philosophy

Jason Stuart

History

Harold Henkel

Information Systems Technology, Mathematics,

Biophysical Sciences

Jason Stuart

Psychology & Counseling

Human Services Counseling, Psychology, Criminal Justice

Instruction & Research Guides

Psyc/Coun- Sandy Yaegle

CJ- Jason Stuart

Collection Development
Sara Baron

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1Steven Bell, “Keep Them Enrolled: How Academic Libraries Contribute to Student Retention,” Library Issues, 29, no. 1 (2008), http://www.libraryissues.com/sub/PDF2901Sep2008.pdf.

2Julie Arendt and Megan Lotts, “What Liaisons Say about Themselves and What Faculty Say about Their Liaisons, a U.S. Survey,” Libraries and the Academy 12, no. 2 (2012), http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v012/12.2.arendt.html.

Easy eBooks

by Sandra Yaegle, Head of Public Services

Feedback Express

Each year on the Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), we receive comments from students who like ebooks (and would like us to buy more) and from others who find them difficult to use and wish we would just stick with printed copies. Here are two comments from the 2014 CSS:

  • “It will help students tremendously with papers, if the library has more ebooks available.”
  • “Reading ebooks is difficult and not user friendly. Having a real book is much nicer, and I have used a purchased book rather than use the ebook.”

The Library currently has over 300,000 ebooks in the collection, and it is becoming easier to find and read them. The first thing you may be asking is how to locate them. The best way to search for ebooks is to use either the Library Catalog or One Search. See our Locating e-Books page for tips on using the Catalog or One Search to find e-books.

All of our e-book collections provide the same full-text access as the printed version. Most of our ebooks also allow you the option of reading online or downloading it to your computer or mobile device. Our Downloading eBooks page has video tutorials that will show you how to do this.

Although nothing quite replaces the feel and smell of paper and ink, ebooks have some nifty features of their own: Some of our ebooks allow you to take notes, look up words in a dictionary, or search for key words or topics inside the book.

For a complete list of ebook collections in the Library, see our ebook Collections page. For your convenience, this page also lists free ebook and audiobook sites on the Web

“There is absolutely no difference between a hardcover book or an audiobook or a multimedia book application. There is no difference between a high quality paper or e-ink screen or a high-resolution Retina display. The biggest pleasure comes from what we read, not from on what we read.”*

Happy reading.

_______________________________

*Piotr Kowalczyk, “50 Most Inspiring Quotes about Books and Reading” Ebook Friendly, 2015, http://ebookfriendly.com/best-quotes-books-reading/.

Library display honors the life and work of Maya Angelou

by Ellen Cox, Business Manager & Special Projects Assistant

Photos of the display can be viewed on our Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Photos of the display can be viewed on our Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Maya Angelou’s 1969 autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, brought the author instant recognition. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou was raised in Stamps, Arkansas by her grandmother. She had a very traumatic childhood, but with her grandmother’s care she survived to become one of the most significant American authors of the twentieth century. Angelou had a varied career, including street car conductor, actress, and dancer. She had only one child—a son—born to her when she was sixteen.

In addition to her bestselling autobiographies, including I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and The Heart of a Woman, she wrote numerous volumes of poetry. She was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in poetry and received the National Medal of Arts in 2000, the Lincoln Medal in 2008, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011.

Maya Angelou died on May 28, 2014, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she lived and attended Mt. Zion Baptist Church. She is outstanding not because she was privileged, but because of her grace under fire. Her lifetime achievements were born out of adversity and struggle. She represents the best of people who overcome prejudice to nurture their unique gifts and to become what God intended them to be.

In recognition of Maya Angelou’s accomplishments, the Library has created a display of her significant works from our collection. The display is located to the left of the reference desk and can also be viewed on the Library’s Facebook, Google+, and Flickr pages.

Book Discussion: The Screwtape Letters, by C. S. Lewis

On Tuesday, February 24, Dr. William Brown, Professor and Research Fellow in the School of Communications, will lead a discussion of The Screwtape Letters, by C. S. Lewis.

The Screwtape Letters is a classic on spiritual warfare and the dynamics of temptation. This profound and striking narrative takes the form of a series of letters from Screwtape, a devil high in the Infernal Civil Service, to his nephew Wormwood, a junior colleague engaged in his first mission on earth, trying to secure the damnation of a young man who has just become a Christian.

The Library has four copies of the novel, plus a playscript of a dramatic adaptation.

The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Gallery (first floor, near the back windows). Distance students and faculty are invited to join in by watching the Google Hangouts On Air
live stream: https://plus.google.com/events/cjgeqagj986d7q3s2pp4fv0i5vs. Make sure to log in with your mail.regent.edu or other gmail account if you want to comment or ask questions!

For more information about this or other Library Book Club events, please contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Finding Scholarly Journals

Feedback Express

In the 2014 Customer Satisfaction Survey, we received a number of comments from students regarding both the ease of access and quantity of our scholarly journal collection. Here are three examples:

  • “I have trouble finding some articles and journals I need.”
  • “Clearer web directions for journals would be helpful.”
  • “The library is very limited when it comes to journals.”

To address the question of access first, finding scholarly journals in full-text is easy, using the Full-Text Journal Finder. This tool indexes all journals, magazines, and newspapers for which the Library databases provide full-text coverage. For most databases, the Full-Text Journal Finder not only points to the correct database, but even links directly to the desired periodical within the database.

Divinity librarian Melody Detar has made a quick YouTube video on this important resource:

With regard to the number of scholarly journals in the Library, we have significantly decreased the quantity of periodicals in print form in recent years in order to subscribe to the greatest possible number of online databases and journals. Our databases currently provide full-text access to more than 270,000 periodicals.

InterLibrary Loan to the Rescue!

In 1815 Thomas Jefferson argued that the Congress required a great library for the reason that “there is…no subject to which a member of Congress may not have occasion to refer.” Like Jefferson, we consider that there is no subject to which a researcher at Regent might not explore, and our InterLibrary Loan team works to ensure that you get the books and articles they need, even if they are not in the University Library.

When you come across a journal to which the Library does not have full-text access, simply place your request through the ILLiad system. In most cases, our InterLibrary Loan team can get the article you need in only 1-3 days. You can also request that we purchase a subscription to a journal using our online Suggest a Title for Purchase form.