Database Trial: World Politics Review

WPRWorld Politics Review (WPR) provides analysis of critical global trends for academics, policymakers, and businesspeople. Written by leading experts and on-the-ground influencers, WPR articles provide access to authoritative analyses, including non-American and non-Western points of view. New content is added daily, and researchers have the option of searching World Politics Review on the company’s website or on the EBSCOhost platform.

Our trial of World Politics Review goes until March 31, 2016. Click here to take the WPR for a test drive on the company’s website and here to search it on EBSCOhost.

The Library strives to acquire the best possible databases for the research needs of Regent students, staff, and faculty. Your input during trials helps us decide whether or not to subscribe to a new database Please share your opinions on this resources by completing our short evaluation form.

2015 Customer Satisfaction Survey Roundup

CSSLast fall, the Library took our 12th annual Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS).* The 2015 CSS, which consisted of separate surveys for students, faculty, and staff, was completed over the course of two weeks in November. Our survey aims to gauge how well we are facilitating student learning and research through our resources, services, and physical space. Thank you to everyone who participated, and congratulations to the five winners in our Amazon gift card appreciation drawing.

We received 571 responses, including hundreds of comments covering nearly every aspect of our services. Click here to view all three surveys.

Kudos!

A number of respondents commented that the Library is a great place to study and is blessed with a friendly, welcoming staff. Here are a just a couple of the praises we received:

  • “The Regent Library outpaces every other university library I have experienced. Staff is helpful, the range of books available is expansive, and the interlibrary loan service has saved my research many times.”
  • “Had it not been for the great services of the Interlibrary Loan, I may have had to drop a course. You have saved me time, and given me opportunity to pursue my calling. Thank you so much!”

However…

Although we are grateful for comments such as these, the real purpose of the CSS is to learn what changes and improvement our users would like to see. Some of the criticisms we received include the following:

  • Excessive noise
  • Problems with interior of Library (signage, furniture, electrical outlets, etc.)
  • Technical problems within the Library website
  • Problems with OneSearch

You spoke, we acted.

In the weeks ahead, we will address these and other topics in this space. The Library makes every effort to implement improvements requested by our faculty and students.

The next CSS will be held in fall 2016, but you don’t have to wait until then to share your thoughts. Send us your ideas anytime through our online comment form.

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*In 2009 and 2012 the LibQUAL+® was used instead of the CSS. LibQual is a standardized instrument administered by the Association of Research Libraries.

Book Discussion: Washington Square, by Henry James

William Glackens, Washington Square 1910

William Glackens, Washington Square 1910

Set in the New York of James’s early childhood, Washington Square is one of Henry James’s most appealing and popular novels, with the most straightforward plot and style of any of his works.

Dr. Austin Sloper is a wealthy and domineering father who is disappointed in his daughter, whom he dismisses as plain and simpleminded. The gentle and dutiful Catherine Sloper has always been in awe of her father, but when she falls in love with Morris Townsend, a penniless charmer whom Dr. Sloper accuses of being a fortune hunter, she dares to defy him. A battle of wills then ensues that will leave her forever changed. Readers have long admired the way that the innocent Catherine, misled by her meddling aunt and mistreated by both her father and her suitor, grows in strength and wisdom over the course of the novel.

John Singer Sargent, Two Girls Fishing, 1912

John Singer Sargent, Two Girls Fishing, 1912

The Library Book Club will discuss Washington Square on Thursday, January 28 at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. Distance students and faculty are invited to join in via Google Hangouts.

For information about future book discussions at the Library, see the Library Book Club webpage or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

Finding time to read: a parable about Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt...real reader

TR…real reader

“Once upon a time in the dead of winter in the Dakota Territory, Theodore Roosevelt took off in a makeshift boat down the Little Missouri River in pursuit of a couple of thieves who had stolen his prized rowboat. After several days on the river, he caught up and got the draw on them with his trusty Winchester, at which point they surrendered. Then Roosevelt set off in a borrowed wagon to haul the thieves cross-country to justice. They headed across the snow-covered wastes of the Badlands to the railhead at Dickinson, and Roosevelt walked the whole way, the entire 40 miles. It was an astonishing feat, what might be called a defining moment in Roosevelt’s eventful life. But what makes it especially memorable is that during that time, he managed to read all of Anna Karenina. I often think of that when I hear people say they haven’t time to read.”*

This spring, the Library Book Club invites the Regent and CBN community to devote 20-30 minutes per day to reading literature and to rediscover the pleasure of sharing ideas about books by joining us at our book discussions. The reading schedule is comprised of two great classics and two highly acclaimed contemporary works. All four of titles can be read with as little a commitment as twenty minutes per day, although completing the book is not a requirement for attending the meeting.

Discuss great books books on your lunch hour.

Except for April, all discussions will take place at noon on the final Thursday of the month in the Library Conference Room. Check the events tab of our Facebook or Google+ page for any updates. Tea and refreshments are served, and participants are welcome to bring a lunch.

Distance students and faculty can participate.

Distance students and faculty may join our discussions via Google Hangouts, Google’s free videoconferencing service. Here is the Library’s permanent link for all Hangout events: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/event/c0lnc83s5ok7tecuqdcnjg0mcno?authuser=0&eid=100028809078157626561&hl=en.

For more information about the Library Book Club, see our webpage or contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu.

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*David McCullough, “No Time to Read,” quoted in Connect: College Reading, 2nd edition, by Ivan G. Dole and Leslie Taggart. (Boston: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning, 2012), 474.

Library Book Club Schedule Spring 2014

Month Author Title Date & Time
January Henry James Washington Square
January 28 at 12:00
February Toni Morrison Beloved February 25 at 12:00
April Meir Shalev A Pigeon and a Boy
April 14 at 1:00
June Thomas Hardy Far from the Madding Crowd June 30 at 12:00
 “It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.” ― C.S. Lewis


“It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.”
― C.S. Lewis

 

Database Trial: Drama Online

Drama onlineThe Library has a trial subscription to Drama Online, an award-winning database for theatre arts. Just a small sampling of the content In Drama Online includes:

  • Playscript from Aeschylus to the present day.
  • The internationally renowned Arden Shakespeare Series.
  • Hundreds of audio recordings of classic and modern plays.
  • Videos of 21 productions from the New Globe Theatre in London.
  • Masterclasses from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London.

Our trial of Drama Online goes until January 28, 2016. Click here to take it for a test drive.

The Library strives to acquire the best possible databases for the research needs of Regent students, staff, and faculty. Your input during trials helps us decide whether or not to subscribe to a new database Please share your opinions on this resources by completing our short evaluation form.