Category Archives: News Features

Take the Library Customer Satisfaction Survey!

feedbackThe 2017 Library Customer Satisfaction Survey begins today and will continue through March 27. The survey, which takes only ten minutes to complete online, is the primary instrument we use to improve our services. By taking the survey, you can tell us what you like and what you would like to see changed at the Library.

Amazon Gift Card Prizes

This year, we have two surveys: one for students, staff, and non-teaching faculty; and one just for teaching faculty (part-time and full-time). After completing the survey, all participants will have the opportunity to enter a drawing to win a $75 Amazon gift card. Since we will be awarding a gift card for each survey, your chances of winning are quite good with this drawing! More importantly, it is a chance for you to help make the Library an even better place to study and find the best resources for your research. We read every response, and we act on them. Click here to begin the survey.

Summoning Great Things!

by Melody Detar, Divinity Librarian

SummonLogo1On Tuesday, January 17, the Regent University Library celebrated the official roll-out of its new discovery tool, Summon. A discovery tool simplifies the search process by enabling you to search for books and e-books from the Library Catalog and journal articles from most of our databases in a single search. You can find the search tool in the center of the Library homepage. It is the simplest way to launch your research.

As part of our roll-out, we encouraged the Regent community to give Summon a try through a contest that challenged each entrant to answer three search questions. Four entrants who answered correctly were selected at random to win an Amazon gift card. We are happy to congratulate our winners:

  • Ronald Riffle – Student, School of Psychology & Counseling
  • Khandicia Randolph – Student, School of Law
  • Michelle Tabannor – Student, School of Communications & the Arts
  • Zachariah Crompton – Student, College of Arts & Sciences
  • Dr. T.J. Wolfe – Professor, School of Education

We hope this is the beginning of a long and happy relationship with our new discovery tool and that it will improve your research experience. If you have any questions about Summon, a friendly librarian will be happy to assist you. You can also check out a brief tutorial video on our Summon research guide that will introduce you to the powers of this tool.

Disclaimer: Summon is a great tool that will connect you to many resources, but do not discount the importance of searching individual subject databases. Summon is not intended to be your sole research source!

10 New Year’s Resolutions that the Library can help you keep!

mouseby Melody Detar, Divinity Librarian

Happy New Year from the Regent University Library! The New Year is a great time to reflect on the year that has past and think boldly about the year ahead. Many choose to set resolutions, and the folks at the Regent Library want you to know that we support you. Below are ten of the most widely selected resolutions with suggestions on how the Regent Library can help you keep them.

  1. Learn another language – It’s never too late to learn a new language, and we have an incredible program to help! Mango Languages is an interactive learning program that you can use on your computer or mobile device, free of charge through the Library! Choose from over 70 languages and learn as you go about your day.
  2. Get better grades – The Library exists to help students achieve their learning objectives, so we can help with this in so many ways! One of the newest ways is through our new discovery resource, Summon, which is a search tool that looks through thousands of books, ebooks, journal articles, streaming films and more! Summon can bring to your attention articles, books, and other resources that you might not have thought about. Click here for a quick overview of Summon as well as a link to this great new research tool.
  3. Cultivate new hobbies – If you would like to pick up a new hobby, allow us to suggest the strategic game of Go. We have a brief introduction to Go in our blog archives, so arm yourself with a little knowledge, and head over to the Library to play with friends and librarians on the beautiful game board.
  4. Connect with friends – We are online, and your friends probably are too! We would love to connect with you through our social media sites, including Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, YouTube, and Flickr. And don’t forget about our blog.
  5. Read more – This would seem like an obvious goal that a library can help you achieve. However, we can enrich your reading experience and help keep you on track through the Library Book Club! Stretch yourself to read and discuss high quality literature. You can even join the discussion remotely through Google Hangouts. Right now we are reading Silence – Don’t see the movie before you read the book!
  6. Exercise – Exercise your arms by checking out an arm load of books (we’ll even ship them to distance students)! Then exercise your mind by reading them. Or exercise both your body and mind by reading while walking or biking, preferably on a machine rather than on the road.
  7. Pray more – In addition to providing quality research materials, the Regent Library offers a variety of spiritual devotionals to help you through prayer and biblical studies. Next time you are exploring the Library collection, do not forget to look up books that will enhance your spiritual life.
  8. Travel – If your goal is to see the world, let us help you discover and learn about the places you wish to see. You can also learn how to take amazing photos, or learn about ways to prevent travel risks.
  9. Save money – Buy fewer books by borrowing them from the Library! The InterLibrary Loan (ILL) service expands your options beyond what the Regent Library owns by enabling you to access books and articles from other libraries. Learn more about ILL on our YouTube page.
  10. Make new friends – We love our students! Contact a librarian to talk about books, play Go, or just figure out how to do your next research paper.

We are eager to help you succeed – as a student, as a professional, and as the unique person you are. Do not hesitate to contact our friendly librarians for help this semester.

Book Discussion: Ethan Frome, by Edith Wharton

efAt only 100 pages (Penguin edition), Ethan Frome may be the shortest masterpiece in American literature.

Edith Wharton’s tale of forbidden emotions is set on a New England farm in the first decade of the twentieth century. Ethan Frome works and struggles to maintain a bearable existence with his suspicious and hypochondriac wife, Zeenie. But when Zeenie’s vivacious cousin enters their household as a “hired girl,” Ethan finds himself obsessed with her and the dream of happiness she comes to represent. In one of American fiction’s most intense narratives, Wharton moves the ill-starred characters toward their tragic destinies.

On Friday, December 9, professor of literature and film Pete Fraser will moderate a discussion of Ethan Frome. The discussion will take place at 12:00 in the Library Conference Room. We will also view a clip from the 1993 film adaptation starring Liam Neeson, Patricia Arquette, and Joan Allen. The Library has multiple print and electronic copies of the book.

Distance students and faculty are invited to us via Google Hangouts.

For a complete schedule of 2016-2017 book discussions, see the Library Book Club webpage.

Hone your strategic thinking at the Library

The Library's Go set features a heavy bamboo board and natural stone playing pieces.

The Library’s Go set features a heavy bamboo board and natural stone playing pieces.

When two tigers fight, what is left is
one dead tiger and one wounded one.
-Chinese Proverb

Go is a board game that originated in China more than 5,000 years ago. Like chess, Go has always been regarded as a tool for developing strategic thinking, but the mentalities required for success in the two games could hardly be more different.

Chess is a metaphor of decisive battle. Each player strives to capture the opponent’s king by annihilating his capacity to resist. This means that the strategic sense developed by chess is one where the object is total victory.

In contrast to chess’ emphasis on calculation, Go emphasizes judgement. Therefore, Go seems to resemble business or international relations more than warfare. The object is not to destroy, but to build territory. In Go, patience is essential, and greed is punished.

Go writer Peter Shotwell writes that “Japanese executives learned to look at the national and international corporate worlds as Go boards and designed many of their strategies accordingly…One should try to win, but that had to involve allowing the opponent to win something too, because all-out fights might destroy both competitors.”*

The Library has a new professional quality Go set, in front of the reference desk. We hope this set will inspire some of our students to learn about this rich and beautiful game. Intrigued? Check out this short tutorial on the rules:


If you are interested in learning to play Go, contact Harold Henkel at harohen@regent.edu for suggestions on getting started.

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*Peter Shotwell, Go! More Than a Game, (Ruland, VT: Tuttle Publishing, 2003), xi. http://library.regent.edu/record=b1545173~S0